Hartwell Philips Family

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Dr. James Philips

Below picture on the left from Mitchell Woodard
 
This framed painting was given to her father, James Philips Woodard because he had the same name.  He is a son of William C. Woodard and Katherine Bunn.  Katherine is a daughter of Hariett Amanda Philips and Benjamin H. Bunn.  Hariett is a daughter of James Philips who appears in the painting.


He is buried in the Philips Family Cemetery located on his home place at Mount Moriah plantation in Battleboro, Edgecombe County, NC

 

 

 

Dr. James Jones Philips

 

Born 1798, died 10 Apr 1874

 

Married Harriet Amanda Burt

 

Children:

 

      - Judge Frederic Philips                    

        Born 14 Jan 1838, died 14 Jan 1905

 

     - Josephine Philips Pike

 

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Southside Virginia Families

By John Bennett Boddie, Pages 350-356

 

          Dr. James Jones Philips, born 1798, died April 10, 1874, M.D. University of Pa. , successful physician and planter. About 1828 he purchased a plantation in the northwestern part of Edgecombe County, 7 miles from the original Philips settlement on Swift Creek, which he called "Mount Moriah". He married April 23, 1834 Harriet Amanda Burt, born August 4, 1817, died Sept. 28, 1890, the daughter of William Burt and his wife Susan Sims of Hilliardston, Nash County, N.C. Dr. Philips and his wife are buried in the family graveyard at "Mount Moriah".  

Issue of James Jones Philips and his wife Harriet Burt.

 

I.   Sally Tart Philips, born March 22, 1835, m. December 7,   1851 Col. Francis Marion Parker, C.S. A. , son of Theophilus Parker of Tarboro and his wife Mary Toole.

       They had issue:

1.       Mary Parker m. Joseph John Battle. (Battle Book)

2.       James Philips Parker, born 1855.

3.       Theophilus Parker, born 1857, died 1920 unmarried.

4.       Harriet Burt Parker, born 1860, m. Peter Arrington Spruill.

They had issue:

       (1) Peter A. Spruill, died France 1918.

       (2) Mary James Spruill, d. s. p.

       (3) William E. Spruill, m. (1) Florence Chalk; (2) Mary Ann Battle.

       (4) Frank Barker Spruill, married Frances Philips, of whom later.

 

5.       Haywood Parker, born 1864 of Ashville, N.C., m. Josephine Patton .

6.       Francis Marion Parker, born 1867, died unmarried 1913.

7.       Sally P. Parker, born 1870

8.       Kate D. Parker, born 1873.

9.       Frederick M. Parker, born 1875.

 

II.  Susan Sims Philips, born March 6, 1836, died in infancy.

III. Frederick Philips, born June 13, 1838, prominent lawyer and judge, Tarboro, N.C. died June 14, 1905, m. 1864 Martha S. Hyman, 1840-1925, daughter of Henry Hyman and Martha E. Porter.

They had issue:

1.       Anne D. Philips, born May 16, 1866, m. October 22, 1890 Herbert Worth Jackson of Richmond, Va.                                

2.       Mary Philips, married Hal. Wood of Edenton.

3.       James Jones Philips, born 1869.

4.       Martha Hyman Philips, married Dr. Woodward (sic).

5.       Josephine Philips, born October 26, 1878, married April 27, 1905, Albert Pike of Rockbridge County, Va.

6.       Lela Burt Philips, married James D. Gillam.

7.       Frederick Philips.

8.       Henry Hyman Philips, married Ethel Skinner.

 

IV. Susan Sims Philips, second of the name, born September 15, 1842, m. Feb.19, 1861, Joseph John Battle as his first wife.

V.  William Burn Philips, born March 26, 1844, died Jan.29,1856.

VI. Joseph Battle Philips, born Jan.8, 1848, m.(1) Pattie Battle (2) Mary Marriott. See Battle Book for descendants of both marriages.

VII. John Ward Philips, born Jan.31, 1850, of whom later.

VIII. Harriet Amanda Philips, born October 18, 1851, m. Nov.7, 1870, Hon. Benjamin Hickman Bunn, Member of Congress and prominent in local civic affairs. He was the son of Redmond Bunn of "Benvenue", Nash County, N.C., and his wife Mary Bryan.

Harriet Philips and Benjamin H. Bunn had issue:

1.       Mary Bryan Bunn m. George Lewis of Wimberly, M.D. and had issue.

2.       Harriet Amanda Bunn, d.s. p.

3.       James Philips Bunn, atty in Rocky Mount, N.C. m. Ella Lee Moorman and had issue.

4.       Elizabeth Bunn - unmarried.

5.       Redmond Bunn, d. s. p.

6.       Benjamin H. Bunn m. Mavis Lindsey and had issue.

7.       Laura Maud Bunn m. Kemp Davis Battle. (See S.V. F. p. )

8.       Katherine Bunn m. William Coleman Woodard of Rocky Mount. 5 children.

 

                IX.            Laura Maud Philips, born July 1, 1853, m. 1873, John Peter ARRINGTON.

                  X.            Elizabeth Jane Philips, born May 4, 1855, m. George Cullen Battle on November 10, 1875. See Battle Book for descendants.

                XI.            Xl. Martha Parker Philips, born Jan. 18, 1857, died in infancy.

              XII.            Walter Everett Philips, born July 17, 1860, died unmarried May 2, 1939.

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Nonnulla; memories, stories, traditions, more or less authentic
 
The farm hands were employed in digging the marl when there was no other work to be done. Then, early in the year it was hauled into the fields and composted in large piles, with cottonseed, mud from the swamps, the scrapings of the fence corners, the bodies of any domestic animals that had died on the farm, and whatever else came to hand. Commercial fertilizers were but little known when this improvement began. After their introduction they were often used in the compost heaps. Such was the enthusiasm for compost, that sometimes an old and useless animal was killed for the purpose of making compost; and no horse, ox, hog, or other animal that died, was left for the turkey buzzards on a well regulated plantation. Old Dr. James J. Philips once inquired of his Negro foreman, “Luke, what has become of my old jinny [local name for a female donkey]? I have not seen her for some time.”

“Lord, master,” replied Luke, “she wa'n’t no ’count. She done been wore out long ago. I knocked her in the head and put her in a compost pile.”

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J. Kelly Turner and John L. Bridges, Jr.
Published 1920

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In 1850 the society was reorganized and highly commended by the Norfolk Daily News. The Agricultural Society celebrated its first anniversary in 1851 by the delivery of an address by John L. Bridgers, who by his industry, perseverance, and talents was among the foremost in this work. Edmond Ruffin, of Virginia, also took an active part in this work for several years.

Under the guidance of this society, composed of the best farmers of the county, great good resulted in this section of the State. In a few years Edgecombe and Tarboro began a bright career and enjoyed prosperity and contentment. James Philips, an able chemist, was the first to introduce scientific methods of farming in the county. In 1852 he delivered an address before the Agricultural Society, which was later published in the Farmers Journal. In his address Dr. Philips gave an exposition of analytical chemistry as applied to farming. His ideas were later adopted with much profit.

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University of North Carolina, University Libraries, The Southern Historical Collection at the Louis Round Wilson Special Collections Library
 
Collection Number: 00972

Collection Title: James Jones Philips Papers, 1814, 1832-1892.
 
James Jones Philips was a physican and scientific farmer of Edgecombe County, N.C., and his cousin Ethelred Philips (1801-1870) was a physician and farmer of Mariana, Fla. The collection is chiefly letters from Ethelred Philips to James J. Philips. Many of them contain instructions to James in his capacity as the manager of Ethelred's business affairs in North Carolina. Letters often include information on crop yields, prices, and other aspects of the agricultural economy. Ethelred commented on a variety of subjects, including succession and his sympathy for the Union, the Confederate government, censorship, the problems of democracy, and post-war problems. He also discussed religion, philosophy, and the need for church reform and modernization; health care, including reports of various epidemics, his own ill health, and the medicial benefits of brandy, which he apparently liberally prescribed for himself; and relationships with slaves and freedmen. There are also a few letters to and from James J. Philips, Jr. (d. 1865) and other family members. Also included are accounts of James J. Philips; a physician's record book, 1832-1835; and an 1871 book of accounts with laborers. There is also an account book containing estate records, 1849-1858; accounts with Ethelred Philips, 1856- 1869; and accounts with slaves and freedmen, 1859-1860 and 1867-1870.
 
Papers of James Jones Philips (1798-1874), physician and
scientific farmer, of Edgecombe County, N.C., and his cousin
Ethelred Philips (1801-1870), physician and farmer of Marianna, Fla.

The bulk of the materials are letters from Ethelred Philips to James J. Philips. Many of them contain instructions to James in his capacity as the manager of Ethelred's business affairs in North Carolina. Letters often contain information on crop yields, prices, and other aspects of the agricultural economy. 

Their primary value, however, lies in their portrayal of the views and opinions of an articulate, pro-Union Southerner.  Ethelred Philips commented on a variety of subjects, including the political issues of the day--secession, the Confederate government, censorship, problems with democracy, and reconstruction; religion and philosophy, and the need for church reform and modernization; health care--reports of various epidemics, his own ill health, and the medicinal benefits of brandy, which he apparently frequently used himself; and relationships with slaves and freedmen. There are also a few letters to and from James J. Philips, Jr. (d. 1865), and other family members. An 1892 biographical sketch of Dr. James J. Phillips(sic) and an undated "fishing tale" are filed in Series 1.

Also included are three volumes containing medical records and accounts of James J. Philips. Volume 1 is a physician's record book (1832-1835). Volume 2 is an account book of James J. Philips with several estate records, 1849-1858, records with Ethelred Philips, 1856-1869, and accounts with slaves and freedmen, 1859-1860 and 1867-1870. Volume 3 is an 1871 book of accounts with laborers. There are also a few miscellaneous receipts.
 
The collection is arranged as follows:
 
Series 1. Correspondence and Other Items
Series 2. Medical Records
Series 3. Account Books and Receipts
SERIES DESCRIPTIONS

Series 1. Correspondence and Other Items
About 55 items. 1854-1892.

The bulk of the letters in this collection are from Ethelred Philips to his cousin James J. Philips. Many of them contain instructions to James in his capacity as the manager of Ethelred's business affairs in North Carolina. Letters often contain information on crop yields, prices, and other aspects of the agricultural economy. Their primary value, however, lies in their portrayal of the views and opinions of an articulate, pro-Union Southerner. Ethelred Philips commented frequently on political issues of the day; including secession, the Confederate government, censorship, problems with democracy, and reconstruction; religion and philosophy, and the need for church reform and modernization; health care, including reports of various epidemics, his own ill health, and the medicinal uses of brandy and whiskey; and relationships with slaves and freedmen.

There are also a few letters to and from James J. Philips, Jr. (d. 1865), and other family members. An 1892 biographical sketch of Dr. James J. Phillips(sic) and an undated "fishing tale" are filed in folder 3.

Folder 1 1854-1860
2 1861-June 1865
3 July 1865-1881, 1892, and undated

Series 2. Medical Records
2 items. 1831-1835 and undated.

A book of accounts (volume 1) with many of the leading  families of Edgecombe and surrounding counties for physician's services and drugs. Some of the patients included may have been slaves. There is also an undated cure for what is termed "the eating cancer."

Folder 4 Volume 1

Series 3. Account Books and Receipts
9 items. 1814, 1849-1877.

Two account books (volumes 2 and 3) and receipts of James J. Philips. Volume 2 includes Philips's accounts as an administrator of the estate of Bennett Bunn, 1849-1851, and several other estates, 1851-1858; provisions supplied to slaves, 1859-1860; accounts with Ethelred Philips, 1856-1869;
miscellaneous accounts, 1863-1865; and accounts with freedmen, 1867-1870. Volume 3 includes Philips's accounts with hired laborers and records of days lost and provisions advanced to them. The miscellaneous receipts include an 1814 court receipt for Hope Adams (apparently a distant relation), a Confederate bond, two Confederate tax-in-kind forms, and an 1881 railroad receipt.

Folder 5 Volume 2, 1849-1870
6 Volume 3, 1871-1877
7 1814, 1864-1865, 1888

So far I've been unable to identify the exact relationship of this Dr. Etheldred Philips with the rest of the Philips family.  I notice that the record of his MD degree below spells his name Etheldred while several of the other references spell it without the "d".  I suspect this is just an error as the name Etheldred is not used often, if ever, today and is easy to mispell.  Even the story of his tombstone spells his name without the "d" even though the "d" is clearly shown on the tombstone.

Following is an excerpt from the book The Battle of Marianna, Florida,  By Dale Cox

Dr. Ethelred Philips, A Florida Unionist


This stone at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Marianna marks the final resting place of Dr. Ethelred Philips (1806-1870).
 
Dr. Philips was one of a number of prominent Unionists who lived in Marianna at the time of Civil War. He is one of the best remembered, thanks to a steady stream of letters he wrote to relatives in North Carolina.
When Union troops threatened the city on September 27, 1864, many men with known Unionist sympathies joined the Confederate forces preparing to defend Marianna. Philips considered himself too old (he was 58) to fight, but offered up his personal firearms for use by other defenders.
He was on the battlefield before the smoke cleared offering medical treatment for his wounded friends and neighbors of the Marianna Home Guard. Despite his pro-Union sympathies, Dr. Philips was always held in high regard by the citizens of Marianna.

The below record shows that Etheldred Philips received him MD from the University of Virginia in 1836.

General alumni catalogue of the University of Pennsylvania

 By University of Pennsylvania. General Alumni Society

etheldredphilipsmd.jpg

Edgecombe County, NC – Miscellaneous Wills, S-W

Ward, Charlotte will, NC State Archives, Edgecombe Co. Wills,
CR.037.801.31.  Recorded book G, page 111.  In the name of God, Amen, I Charlotte Ward of Edgecombe County North Carolina being of sound mind..... acknowledging no other of a previous date..... Item- I lend to my nephew Etheldred Philips of Florida during his life all my lands, negros and every other species of property and at his decease to his children; Item- I require
of the said Etheldred Philips in consideration of the above loans to him and gifts to his children the following: 1- that he will continue to farm and keep the lands and negros together; 2- that he will pay to Joseph J.E. Porter a legacy of $500; 3- that he shall pay all my just debts; 4- that he shall have the graveyard where my late husband, John Ward and my son, Joseph was buried and where I wish to be buried well enclosed and a tomb stone placed to each grave or a suitable monument for the whole;  If nephew does not choose
to accept terms, property to be sold and will carried out.  Item- I appoint my nephew, Etheldred Philips and my friend and relative, (Bob F. Moore) executors; signed Charlotte Ward, wit. James J. Philips, W.F. Lewis.  Codicil- I give to the (daughters) of Etheldred Gray, dec'd, Martha N. Howell, Mary Gray, Wm. F. Gray, Virginia Gray, Helen B. Gray, and in case the negroes increase in number the child of Caroline Gray, viz Caroline Gray (Bonner) shall come in and share equally with the others the following negroes: Nicy and her daughter, Eliza and the children of said Eliza to wit, Sampson, Sam and Sela and their increase, signed Apr. 30 1855, Charlotte
Ward, wit. James J. Philips, John G. Lewis. 

The following will appears to be that of John Ward, the husband on Charlotte Ward whose will appears above.
 
4 Sep 1823. Will of John WARD, Edgecombe Co., NC, names wife and extrx.  Charlotte, son Joseph J. E. WARD (under age) son David E. WARD - all my  property in TN, Joseph J. E. WARD all my property in this state after  wife's death. Extr. and testementary Gdn. to my son Joseph J (?) E.  WARD, Louis D. Wilson, S. Whitaker. Bro. Dicken WARD, my exr. in state  of TN and Gdn to my son David C. WARD. Wit: Nancy Philips, John N.  Philips, Timothy M. Philips. Nov Ct 1823. Bk F. p.4. 

Following in the will of Joseph Philips, born abt 1791, died abt 1822 Edgecombe County NC, married Ann Taylor, only child Mary Philips.  Notice the name Dr. John F. Ward who is both a guardian of Joseph's daughter Mary and a witness to the will. 
JOSEPH PHILIPS – Dec. 23 1819, Feb Ct. 1822 – Wife Nancy, lend whole of my lands, 650 A lying on SS of Swift Creek, boundaries ascertained reference division of my father, Exum Philips and deed of sale from Horatio E. Hall, reversion to chil, 10 negroes, all h. hold and kitchen furn, also sufficient pork and corn to serve her and her family for 1 yr; Dau Mary, 10 negroes. Unborn child to share equally with Mary; John Taylor of Martin Co, father-in-law, Dr. John F. Ward, Gdn for Mary. Exrs father-in-law John Taylor, Bro, Matthew Philips, Elias Bryan, Exum Lewis   WIT: James J. Philips, Ethelred Philips, John F. Ward