Williams Family

Home. .Williams Family Tree. .Reference Info. .Mississippi County AR. .Early Halifax NC. .Early Nashville TN. .John Williams (1). .Richard Williams (2). .Littletown. .Joshua Williams (3). .Maps. .Historical North Carolina Maps . .Two Elishas (a). .Two Elishas (b). .Elisha Williams, Sr (4). .Couer de Lion Thoroughbred. .Scotland Neck Trinity Church. .Betsy Williams (5). .William Williams, Sr. (5). .Mary Wharton Williams (6). .John Wharton Williams (6). Dr. William Williams, Jr. (6) .Charlotte Philips Williams (6). . Elisha Williams Jr (5). .Sarah Josey Ray WILLIAMS (6). .Henry J. Williams (6). .Josiah Frederick Williams (5). .Ewing Family. .Milbrey Horn Williams (6). .Joseph Philips Williams (6). .Rebecca Philips Williams (6). .Rowena Josey Williams (6). .Elisha Williams (6). .James H. Williams (6). .Edward H. Williams (7). .Margaret "Maggie" Donelson Williams (7). .Sallie Williams Cartwright (7). .Edward James Williams (8). .Frank D. Williams(8) . .Nelle Francis Williams (8). .Henry P. Williams (6). .Sarah Elizabeth Williams (6). .Mary Thomas "Money" Williams (6). .John Maxey Williams (6). .Martha M. Williams (6). .Margaret Williams (6). . Mama Nelle and Pop . . Joseph Philips . . Sylvan Hall Cemetery . .Contacts. Larry's Home Page

.William Williams, Sr. (5).

William Williams is a son of Elisha Williams and Sarah Josey

Born: 15 April, 1776 Halifax County, NC
Died: 6 Mar 1862 in Nashville, TN
 
Married: Sarah "Sallie" Philips 11 Feb, 1807
She was born 1 Aug 1783 in Edgecombe County NC and died 19 Jan 1859 in Davidson County TN
 

Children of WILLIAM WILLIAMS and SARAH PHILIPS are:

 ........ 2   Elizabeth "Betsy" Norfleet WILLIAMS ref #: 610 b: 02 Jan 1807 in NC  d: 24 Mar 1826 in Rutherford Co TN

............  +Evander McIver ref #: 33 b: 1795  in Nashville TN

                d: 1828 in Davidson County TN


........ 2   Martha "Patsy" Hunter WILLIAMS ref #: 611 b: 29 Nov 1809

              d: 03 Nov 1833

........ 2    Charlotte Philips Williams  ref #: 612 b: 22 Jan 1812 in Davidson Co TN

               d: 21 Jun 1887 in Nashville, Davidson Co TN

............  +William B. A. Ramsey ref #: 33 b: 04 Feb 1799 in Knoxville TN

                d: 27 Apr 1874 in Edgefield, Davidson County TN

........ 2   Henry Horne WILLIAMS ref #: 613 b: 03 May 1814 in Davidson Co TN

              d: 14 Jul 1826 in Davidson Co TN

..........2   Mary Wharton Williams ref #: 615 b: 26 Oct 1816 in Davidson Co TN

              d: 21 Mar 1839 in Davidson Co TN

............  +Robert M. Porter ref #: 80 

........ 2   William WILLIAMS ref #: 614 b: 25 Feb 1819 in Davidson Co TN

               d: 12 Feb 1888 in Davidson Co TN

............  +Elizabeth Mary Donelson ref #: 272 

...................  3    Margaret Donelson WILLIAMS  ref #: 271   

.......................    +Scott Davis  ref #: 273   

...................  3    Evander M WILLIAMS  ref #: 275   

.......................    +Lizzie Bate  ref #: 277   

...................  3    Salie WILLIAMS  ref #: 278   

.......................    +Nicholas Sumner Love  ref #: 279   

...................  3    William Henry WILLIAMS  ref #: 280  b: 03 Dec 1885  d: 30 Oct 1894

...................  3    Emma WILLIAMS  ref #: 281   

.......................    +William Louis Dismukes  ref #: 282   

...................  3    Eula WILLIAMS  ref #: 283   

.......................    +Robert Vaughn  ref #: 284   

........ 2   John Wharton "Cousin Jack" WILLIAMS ref #: 616 b: 02 Sep 1823 in Davidson Co TN

              d: 17 Feb 1892 in AR

............  +Anna Fletcher 1858 b: abt 1834 ref #: 287 

...................  3    Susan F. WILLIAMS  b: abt 1861 ref #: 81   

...................  3    Sallie P. Williams WILLIAMS  b: abt 1866 ref #: 82   

...................  3    Elliott WILLIAMS  ref #: 83  b: abt 1864 in Luxora, AR 

........  *1st Wife of John Wharton "Cousin Jack" WILLIAMS:  

............  +Martha Pennington ref #: 285 b: 25 Sep 1825 d: 1857

........ 2   Joseph Philips WILLIAMS ref #: 617 b: 16 Feb 1824 in Davidson Co TN

              d: 14 Apr 1846 in Davidson Co TN

........ 2   Maria Graham WILLIAMS ref #: 618 b: 14 Oct 1826 in Davidson Co TN

              d: 19 Nov 1853 in Davidson Co TN

........ 2   Evander "Van" McIver WILLIAMS ref #: 619 b: 25 May 1829 in Davidson Co TN
              d: 19 Nov 1853 in Davidson Co TN

Evander McIver Williams recorded his will in the Davidson County TN records as shown below.

ELISHA WILLIAMS and Sarah Josey were born in Halifax Co., N. C., and were left orphans without brother or sister. They were married in 1773. Four of their children lived to mature age,—Elizabeth, William, Josiah F., and Elisha.

William Williams was born in Halifax Co., N. C., April 15, 1776.  He graduated at Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., in 1799. Judge Joseph Story was a member of the same class, and as warm personal friends they corresponded through life. (See the letter at the bottom of this page from Judge Story who was a Supreme Court Justice from 3 Feb 1812 - 10 Sep 1845.  Judge Story was appointed at the age of 32, making him the youngest Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.) 


Returning home, he read law with Judge Haywood.

In 1804 he came to Nashville with the view of settling, and Pur­chased the Evans grant of six hundred and forty acres, four miles from Nashville, on the Gallatin road. The following year he moved to the farm, bringing with him his father and mother and brothers.  His father, then in bad health, died soon after.

Note:  A review of Davidson County Deed Book F page 309 shows that William Williams purchased acreage on the north side of the Cumberland River from John Evans on 6 June 1805 and the sale was recorded 25 December 1805.
 
John Evans recorded his grant of 640 acres from NC in Davidson County Deed Book A page 115.

The below segment came from the book "History of Davidson County by W. Woodford Clayton, page 258" and available in the Tennessee Archives, call # F443. D2. C6 1880A v.2c.1 (Books).

William Williams and Sally Philips, a daughter of Joseph Philips and Milbrey Horn, were married in Davidson County, February, 1807, by the Rev. Thomas B. Craighead. She was a woman of firmness, of kindness, and of practical sense.

The children born of this marriage were Eliza, Martha, Charlotte, Henry, Mary, William, John, Joseph, Maria, and Evander. The girls were educated at the Nashville Female Academy.  All of them died soon after reaching womanhood except Charlotte, who married Col. W. B. A. Ramsey, of Edgefield.  Henry, Joseph, and Evander died in early man­hood.

William Williams practiced his profession in Nashville and the counties adjoining Davidson for twenty-five years.  He was not a fluent speaker, but what he said or wrote was always a strong argument, and his conclusions very apt to be correct.  He was noted for punctuality in all his business. 

As a legislator he studied the interest of Tennessee.  After discontinu­ing the practice of law he was elected a magistrate without solicitation, which office he filled for several terms.  A great part of this time he was chairman of the County Court, the duties of which he performed with marked ability and fidel­ity. 

He was a trustee of the Robertson Academy, the Craig­head Academy, and the Nashville University for many years, and took a deep interest in their success. 

In religion he was a Presbyterian.  He, his wife, and two daughters joined the church in Nashville in 1833, when Dr. John T. Edgar became pastor, and subsequently two daughters and four sons joined the same church.  He was for years an elder of the church in Nashville, and an elder of the church in Edgefield at the time of his death, which occurred March 6, 1862, his mind unim­paired and his body not showing old age.

His son, William Williams, graduated at the Nashville University in 1839; taught a male academy three years; graduated at the Louisville Medical College in 1845; settled in Hendersonville, Sumner Co., and married Lizzie B., eldest daughter of Daniel S. Donelson and Margaret Branch, May, 1849. Moving to the old homestead in 1865, he discon­tinued the practice of medicine, and has since devoted his time to the improvement of his farm, to the rearing and edu­cating of his children, to the cause of public schools, and to the Church.  The names of their children are Margaret, Mary Eliza, Evander, Sally, William, Emma, and Eula.  Maggie Bessie Davis, a bright child two years old, occupies the place in the affections of the members of the family circle made va­cant by the death of her mother.  His son, John W. Williams, graduated at the Nashville University in 1841; surveyed land in Texas several years; read law; married Martha, youngest daughter of Graves Pennington, of Davidson County; pur­chased a farm in Mississippi Co., Ark. His wife dying, he married Anna, eldest daughter of Col. Elliot Fletcher, of Ar­kansas. They have three children,—Susan, Elliot, and Sally.

Mrs. Martha Martin, a sister of Mrs. Williams, is the only unbroken link connecting the family to the past century.  She was born in a fort four miles from Nashville, near her present residence, in 1792. She is blessed with good health, a clear mind, a distinct memory, and reads and sews without glasses. Loving and beloved by all who know her, in select words and sweet voice she relates the history of six gener­ations, whom she remembers perfectly.  By reading she keeps up with the age.  Her Bible and hymn-book are always near her.  Her lamp full of oil she keeps trimmed and burning, cheerfully and hopefully watching and waiting the coming of her Lord.

Below are sections of the 1810 and 1812 Davidson County Tax Rolls showing Josiah Frederick Williams with 476 acres and 25 blacks, his brother William Williams with 919 acres and 17 blacks, and their mother Sarah Williams with no land and 7 blacks.

William Williams purchased several parcels of land which he added to his holding over time:

William Williams purchased 39 acres on the Cumberland River from Simpson Williams on 1 May 1813 and recorded it 25 July 1814 in Deed Book K page 315.

On 18 March 1816 William purchased acreage from Thomas B. Craighead and recorded it 6 May 1816 in Deed Book L Page 170.


On 20 June 1816 William purchased 144 acres on the Cumberland River from Ellenor Johnson etals and recorded the purchase 25 May 1818 in Deed Book M Page 242.

On 25 December 1812 William purchased 201 acres on the Cumberland River from his father-in-law Joseph Phillips (Philips) and recorded the sale on 15 August 1822 in Deed Book Q Page 32..

On 3 October 1827 William purchased 459 acres from Boyd McNairy and recorded the purchase on 15 November 1827 in Deed Book R page 459.

On 28 December 1844 William purchased 388 acres on McLemore Street from Isaac Paul and recorded the purchase on 9 April 1845 in Deed Book 7 page 388.

John Evans 640 Acres – North Side of Cumberland river, Grant 49 Issued 17 April 1786, D1075

State of No Carolina Davidson County Sam’l Barton Entry Officer To the Surveyor of said County --- Greeting These are to Authorise and Require you to Measure & Survey for Jn’o Evans A Preempt’t of 640 Acres of Land Lying on the N Side of Cumberland on Both Sides Evan Spring Branch, Beginning at an Ash Tree Corner to Ephraim McLanes Survey No 5 & 6 Running with a Conditional line of Sd McLanes Survey No 5 to a hackberry thence West to Include his Spring & Impt’s for Qty as for Entry No 202 Jan’y 29 1784 And for your So doing this Shall be your Warrant given under my hand this 11th day of Oct 1784

Sam’l Barton ET

State of North Carolina Davidson County August 10th 1784 agreeable to the Inclosed Warrant No 202 the entry Dated Jan’y 29th 1784 I have survey’d for John Evans a preemption of Six hundred and forty acres of land lying on the north Side of Cumberland River on both sides of Evanss Spring branch beginning at an Ash tree on evanss Spring branch being the beginning Corner of Ephraim McLeans Survey No 5 and 6 running thence a conditional line with Mclanes Survey No 5 South Sixty one degrees west one hundred and forty poles to a hackberry thence west one hundred and Sixteen poles to a honey locust thence a Conditional line with the heirs of Edward Carvin beginning at a honey locust tree The Southernmost of John Evanss South west corner thence a conditional line with Evans north one hundred and twenty poles to a honey locust – Crossing Carvins spring branch thence West ninety eight poles to an elm and hackberry thence north three hundred and thirty two poles to an ash and sugar tree Crossing the Road from Gaspars Station to Nashville thince East one hundred and eighty five poles to an ash and hackberry thince South one hundred and two poles to a hackberry thence a conditional line with Ephraim McLanes Survey no 6 South twenty nine degrees east three hundred and twenty poles to the beginning

Survey by James Mulherin Dep Surveyor, Dan’l Smith Surveyor

From James Douglas Anderson: Making the American Thoroughbred, especially in Tennessee, 1800-1845. (Norwood, Mass., 1q16, p. 120.) Tennessee State Archives Call # SF291. A6. c 1&3

 

William Williams, of Davidson County, was, in his own words, “an occasional breeder on a small scale,” and always kept a few brood mares of the richest blood. 

 

As late as 1830 Williams and other members of the family had descendants of a horse and mare owned by their father, Elisha Williams, of Scotland Neck, Halifax County, North Carolina, between 1786 and l791. The horse was the famous Harris’ Eclipse by imp Fearnought; the mare by imp Janus. 

A noted brood mare of her time owned by Williams was Fanny Foster, by Symmes’ Wildair, dam by old Partner. 

 

Williams lived four miles from Nashville on the Gallatin road. 

As Circuit Judge be presided ever many trials in the Court House and as Secretary of the Nashville Jockey Club he arranged for many trials on the race track. 

 
He attended Harvard with Supreme Court Associate Justice Joseph Story  and corresponded with him through subsequent years. Also, he frequently wrote for The Turf Register.
 
His most lengthy con­tributions to thoroughbred literature may be found in The Tennessee Agriculturist, of 1840, and in “Frank Forester’s” “The Horse of America.”

The 1880 book “History of Davidson County”  page 248 is dedicated to William Williams and contains the following additional information.

ELISHA WILLIAMS and Sarah Josey were born in Halifax Co., N. C., and were left orphans without brother or sister. They were married in 1773(actually married in 1775 and this is the only reference I've seen that they were orphans). Four of their children lived to mature age,—Elizabeth, William, Josiah F., and Elisha.

William Williams was born in Halifax Co., N. C., April 15, 1776.  He graduated at Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., in 1799. Judge Joseph Story was a member of the same class, and as warm personal friends they corresponded through life.  Returning home, he read law with Judge Haywood.

In 1804 he came to Nashville with the view of settling, and Pur­chased the Evans grant of six hundred and forty acres, four miles from Nashville, on the Gallatin road. The following year he moved to the farm, bringing with him his father and mother and brothers.  His father, then in bad health, died soon after.

William Williams and Sally Philips, a daughter of Joseph Philips and Milbrey Horn, were married in Davidson County, February, 1807, by the Rev. Thomas B. Craighead. She was a woman of firmness, of kindness, and of practical sense.

The children born of this marriage were Eliza, Martha, Charlotte, Henry, Mary, William, John, Joseph, Maria, and Evander. The girls were educated at the Nashville Female Academy.  All of them died soon after reaching womanhood except Charlotte, who married Col. W. B. A. Ramsey, of Edgefield.  Henry, Joseph, and Evander died in early man­hood.

William Williams practiced his profession in Nashville and the counties adjoining Davidson for twenty-five years.  He was not a fluent speaker, but what he said or wrote was always a strong argument, and his conclusions very apt to be correct.  He was noted for punctuality in all his business. 

As a legis­lator he studied the interest of Tennessee.  After discontinu­ing the practice of law he was elected a magistrate without solicitation, which office he filled for several terms.  A great part of this time he was chairman of the County Court, the duties of which he performed with marked ability and fidel­ity. 

He was a trustee of the Robertson Academy, the Craig­head Academy, and the Nashville University for many years, and took a deep interest in their success. 

In religion he was a Presbyterian.  He, his wife, and two daughters joined the church in Nashville in 1833, when Dr. John T. Edgar became pastor, and subsequently two daughters and four sons joined the same church.  He was for years an elder of the church in Nashville, and an elder of the church in Edgefield at the time of his death, which occurred March 6, 1862, his mind unim­paired and his body not showing old age.

His son, William Williams, graduated at the Nashville University in 1839; taught a male academy three years; graduated at the Louisville Medical College in 1845; settled in Hendersonville, Sumner Co., and married Lizzie B., eldest daughter of Daniel S. Donelson and Margaret Branch, May, 1849. Moving to the old homestead in 1865, he discon­tinued the practice of medicine, and has since devoted his time to the improvement of his farm, to the rearing and edu­cating of his children, to the cause of public schools, and to the Church.  The names of their children are Margaret, Mary Eliza, Evander, Sally, William, Emma, and Eula.  Maggie Bessie Davis, a bright child two years old, occupies the place in the affections of the members of the family circle made va­cant by the death of her mother (who I believe to be Margaret who married a Davis).

His son, John W. Williams, graduated at the Nashville University in 1841; surveyed land in Texas several years; read law; married Martha, youngest daughter of Graves Pennington, of Davidson County; pur­chased a farm in Mississippi Co., Ark. His wife dying, he married Anna, eldest daughter of Col. Elliot Fletcher, of Ar­kansas. They have three children,—Susan, Elliot, and Sally.

Mrs. Martha Martin, a sister of Mrs. Williams, is the only unbroken link connecting the family to the past century.  She was born in a fort four miles from Nashville, near her present residence, in 1792. She is blessed with good health, a clear mind, a distinct memory, and reads and sews without glasses. Loving and beloved by all who know her, in select words and sweet voice she relates the history of six gener­ations, whom she remembers perfectly.  By reading she keeps up with the age.  Her Bible and hymn-book are always near her.  Her lamp full of oil she keeps trimmed and burning, cheerfully and hopefully watching and waiting the coming of her Lord.

Sylvan Hall Cemetery, Nashville, Davidson County,TN
Click on any picture to see a larger version

Monument of William Williams and his wife Sarah "Sally" Philips

The east side of the obelisk showing the names of Wm. Williams and Wally Philips, Married Feb 11, 1807.

The south side of the obelisk containing William William's name and "Born: Apr 15 1776" and "Died: Mar 6 1862" 

The north side of the obelisk containing Sally Philip's name and "Born Aug. 1, 1788" and Died Jan. 19, 1859".

William Williams wife Sally Philips is the daughter of Joseph Philips who lived on Dickerson Pike near what is now Old Hickory Blvd.  She was born 1 Aug, 1783 and died 19 Jan, 1859 in Nashville, TN.
 
Sally is the sister of Peggy Thomas Philips who married William Williams' brother, Josiah Frederick Williams, the owner of Maplewood, a large plantation on Gallatin Pike just north of Inglewood.   William and Sally lived across Gallatin Pike from Maplewood on a large farm.

Written by Henry Philips Williams,  February 17, 1892,  at ‘Greenleaf,’ his farm at Guthrie,  Ky., about 15 miles north of  the Tennessee border.  Henry Williams was in his 64th year when he wrote this account, and he lived for another 10 years. He died at Greenleaf on Feb. 22, 1902. 

 

Sometime about the year 1700 there came from Wales a man who was the father of your great-great-Grandfather.  I don't know his name but he settled in Pennsylvania and his son William Williams, in course of time moved to Caldwell County, North Carolina where he married a Miss Thomas. This was in or about 1742.  Several children were born of this marriage, his son Elisha being the second child.  Now this Elisha Williams was the father of your Grandpa Josiah Williams.  He was married in 1772 to Miss Josey and had three sons and one daughter. 

 

Will Williams, born 1776 (father of cousin Jack);

Aunt Betsey born in 1778,

Elisha born in 1782

and your Grandpa born 1786. 

 

The family moved to Tennessee in 1804 I think, and your Grandpa Josiah Williams married Margaretta Phillips in 1815 and had twelve children; James Williams, your father was one of the twelve.

 Speaking of our family I should tell you that your great-Grandpa was
highly educated and of quite a literary turn.  He was wealthy and gave all his children finished educations.  Cousin Jack's father was a graduate of Harvard University, Massachusetts and your grand-uncle Elisha and your Grandpa were graduated from Chappel Hill College, North Carolina.  Both read
latin fluently and their handwrite was most excellent.

 In mathematics he was superior to any of his boys.  I have heard him say
that his father was one of the best read men in North Carolina, and that his Grandfather was highly educated.  Grandfather Phillips was a close personal friend of my Grandfather Williams and finally induced him to move out to Tennessee.  He selling his real estate and giving part to his daughter Elizabeth who married a wealthy man in North Carolina named Thomas Alston. You may not know it but my Father and my Uncle (Jack's Father) married sisters, Sally and Margaretta Phillips, and through Grandfathers Williams and Phillips all the fine real estate near Nashville was inherited by Cousin Jack's father which is now known as the William's Estate.

The paragraph below was excerpted from the following:
 
History of Davidson County, Tennessee, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers, by Prof. W. W. Clayton, J. W. Lewis & Co., Philadelphia, 1880, p. 72

RECOLLECTIONS OF NASHVILLE
By Col. Willoughby Williams.
 
WILLOUGHBY WILLIAMS
Born in the year 1798; now in my
eighty-second year; mind and
memory unimpaired by age.
 
On the Wharton road the first prominent man was Jesse Wharton, who married the daughter of Joseph Phillaps (sic) a retired lawyer, once member of Congress from the Nashville district, and candidate for Governor in opposition to Governor McMinn; also a magistrate of Davidson County.
 
On the Gallatin road lived Col. Robert Weakley, a very prominent citizen of the county.  Near him lived David Vaughn, a very wealthy man and the father of Michael ind Hiram Vaughn.

Then Mr. William Williams, a retired lawyer and a man of fine intelligence, Josiah Williams, and Thomas Martin, all sons-in-law of Mr. Joseph Phillips, a leading wealthy citizen.

Mrs. Martin is still living, in her eighty-seventh year, at her old home.

Just beyond Mr. Williams lived Samuel Love, near Haysboro', which place was settled about the time Nashville was, and for some time there was great competition between tbe two places. This place was settled by Col. Robert Hays, who married the sister of Mrs. Jackson, and was the father of Col. Stockley P. Hays and the father-in-law of Dr. William E. Butler and Robert I. Chester, both of whom are now living at Jackson, Tenn.

William Williams received a law degree from Harvard University.  Click on these links to read a letter from Harvard, his typed record, and his hand written record.  These records show that he was born in Warrenton NC on 15 April 1776 and died in 1862.  He received his AB degree in 1798 and his AM degree in 1801.

 

The following was excerpted from the book "Memories of Youth and Manhood" by Sidney Willard.

 

Click here to read the Google Book with a section about William Williams.

William Williams of Warrington, North Carolina, was born April 15, 1776.  He was the only member of the class from a slave state, and thought no better of the institution of slavey than did his fellows.  I remember that, on one occasion, when it fell to him and to me to discuss on opposite sides some topic in the weekly meeting of the Society of the Phi Beta Kappa, we took the question, I believe of his choosing, whether slavery at the South or New England rum at the North were the greater evil.  I was reminded of this by the record of the Secretary, a year since, when looking over it for another purpose.

 

As Williams was a stranger to us all when he first came among us, and sat next to me in the recitation room, I immediately made his acquaintance, which became more and more intimate, and our friendship more and more confirmed, in consequence of his spending his vacations in Cambridge so that it was his home for four years.  He was an agreeable visitor at my father’s house, and he bade us farewell at the close of his college career, which we may now consider, though he still lives, to the final to the few survivors of the family.  He could teach me many things, but there was one kind of winter exercise and amusement of which he was ignorant and became a learner, namely, skating.  I can bear witness to the perseverance with which he pursued this exercise in company with me, and the intrepity with which he braved our Boreal blasts.  Indeed, it has seemed to me remarkable as a general fact, that the boys and young men who come hither from the South appear to be more fearless of the severest of our winter weather, and take fewer precautions to guard against it, than the youth of New England.  From the circumstances I have mentioned I became very intimate with my Southern friend, and used sometimes to vex him a little with boyish pranks.  But the hardest words he ever paid to me were, "If you don't be quiet, I'll knock you "; but he never did.


Williams was a faithful and ambitious student. He aimed at distinction, and acquired it.  After the completion of his literary course, and the honors he obtained, there seemed to come over him a prestige of military distinction.  He donned his military beaver, and put on a soldierly air ; but I believe the illusion soon passed off.  He returned to his home, became a lawyer, and practised in that profession for some years in North Carolina, but changed his residence to a large landed estate, of
which he became possessed, about four miles from the then village of Nashville.


I heard nothing of him until the year 1836, when I received a letter from him dated " near Nashville," in which he recommended to my notice a young friend of his who entered the Law School of Harvard University.  "He will be remote from his relatives," said Williams, "and may need some counsel ; and I know of no one to whom I could more properly or cheerfully recommend him than to one by whose side I sat for four years at recitations, lectures, and prayers, in uninterrupted harmony. I take the more pleasure in introducing him to you from the belief that he is worthy, and from the recollection of the kindness I received from your venerated father.  "These tokens of remembrance, after thirty-eight years agone, were grateful to me, and by me reciprocated on the return of the gentleman whom he introduced to the place whence he came.  About the beginning of the spring of 185З, a very estimable friend and classmate * paid him a visit, and at my request gave me an account of it in writing, which, in some of its circumstances that I here introduce, may be interesting to every reader of these brief memorials.

 

This friend was traveling in the West, and says: — " In Cincinnati I met with two gentlemen from Nashville, who were acquainted with Williams, and who wished me to accompany them on their return, which I did, passing down the Ohio, about five hundred miles to the mouth of Cumberland River, and thence two hundred miles to Nashville (a neighborly call even for a backwoodsman).  On my arrival at Nashville I sent a note to Williams, informing him of the place at which I stopped, and he came in his carriage and took me to his home, about four miles from the city.  One of the gentlemen whom I accompanied to Nashville interested himself very much in our interview, and introduced him to me by another name, to see whether I should recognize him, which I did not, supposing him to be a gentleman of the city; but soon suspecting the plan, I eyed him more sharply, and, listening to his quick, decided manner of speaking, and catching the corresponding expression of his eye, I recognized our old friend Williams.  He could catch no trace of my early looks, and could be hardly made to believe in my identity.  But after a while he made up his mind that I was no impostor, and we talked, and looked, and felt as we did more than fifty years ago.  Until we met, he had seen no college classmate since he took his degree. 

 

" In addition to the care of his large estate he presides over an important county or municipal court, and is interested and takes a part in the public institutions, and is a highly respected and influential citizen.  I always thought he would take part in public life ; but he would not condescend to the practices necessary to win public favor, and became indifferent to it."

 

• Humphrey DeTerenx, Esq., of Salem.

From the book "History of the Harvard Law School and of Early Legal Conditions in America, Volume 3"

justicejosephstory.jpg

Supreme Court Associate Justice Joseph Story

Letter from Judge Story to his classmate, William Williams, of Tennessee, written Feb. 17, 1823:

 

You speak of Harvard College. Its prosperity in literature and science is truly great, and in my judgment place it beyond all question, as the first literary institution in America. You have doubtless heard many misrepresentations as to its religious character.

 

I will not disguise that the religious sentiments of its President and Professors are far more liberal than those of our good Doctor Tappan. By liberal, I mean less Calvinistic and more

charitable. Unitarian sentiments are certainly prevalent there ; but they are not taught as a part of the studies. . . . I may say, indeed, that by far the most enlightened, learned, and

able of our present clergy, as well as laity, in Massachusetts, are Unitarians, and their opinions are manifestly gaining ground.

 

This of course gives much uneasiness to other states, and, as usual, gives rise to many false statements. . . . Our classmate, Dr. Channing is a Unitarian minister of most distinguished talents and character. . . . If you wish to have a child educated at Cambridge, I do not think that you need feel his religious obligations and feelings will be injured.

 

But in making these remarks, I beg you to understand that I myself am a decided Unitarian.

From the Family Bible of William Williams

(born 15 Apr 1776)

Larry Feldhaus 21 Jan 2008)

 

Click on this link to view a file containing images of the original pages from the bible. 

 

Page 2 – Marriages – Column 1

 

Elisha Williams & Sarah Josey were married in March 1775 Halifax Co. No. Car.  They had six children. 

 

William born 15 April 1776

Elizabeth 1778

Josuah died young

Elisha 21 Sep 1783

Josiah 2 Feb 1786

Martha died young

 

Elisha Wms died Aug 1811.  Sarah his wife Feby 1851 at 95. 

 

John W. Williams -> Martha daughter of Graves Pennington were married July 29 1852 Davidson Co. Tn.

 

Page 2 – Marriages – Column 2

 

William Williams & Salley Philips were married by the Rev. Tho B. Cartwright on the 11th day of February 1807 Davidson Co. Tn.

 

Evander McIver and Elizabeth Williams were married by the Rev Ben Herman (name hard to read) on the 16th Mar 1826 Davidson Co Tn.

 

Robert Porter -> Mary W. Williams were married by the Rev Dr. John T. Edgar on 4 Dec 1838 Davidson Co. Tn.

 

William Williams -> Lizzie, daughter D. S. Donaldson were married in Sumner County TN.

 

Page 2 – Marriages – Bottom of page

 

W. B. A. Ramsey & Charlotte P. Wiliams were married on the 25th of December 1860 by the Rev I. Thilman Kendrick. (name hard to read) .

 

Page 3 – Births – Column 1

Will & Salley Williams children

 

Betsey Norfleet born January 2nd in 1807

Patsey Hunter 29 of Novr in 1809

Charlotte Philips 22 Jany 1812

Henry Horne the 3rd of May 1814

Mary Wharton 28th of Octr 1816

William 25th of Feb 1819

John Wharton 5th Sept 1821

Joseph Philips 16 Feb 1825

Maria Graham 14 Oct 1826

Evander McIver 25th of May 1829

 

Salley Philips daughter of Joseph Philips & Milbrey Horne was borne 1st Aug 1788 Edgecomb Co. No Car

 

Page 3 – Births – Column 2

 

William B. A. Ramsey was born at Swan Pond in Knox County Tenn on the 4th day of February 1799

 

The following link is to Ancestry.com where several generations of Ramsey's ancestors are listed.

 

http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/pedigree.aspx?pid=11017842&st=1

 

Page 4 – Marriages – Column 1

 

William B. A. Ramsey & Eliza H. C. White were married at Knoxville Tenn on the 21st of October 1834.

 

William B. A. Ramsey and Susan P. Washington were married at Nashville Tenn on the 8th day of May 1842.

 

Page 5 – Deaths – Column 1

 

Betsey N.      March 24, 1826

Henry H.        July 14, 1826

Patsey H.      Nov 3, 1833

Mary W. P.    Mar 21, 1839

Joseph P.     Apr 14, 1846

Maria G.         Nov 19, 1853

 

William B. A. Ramsey departed this life on the 27th day of April, 1874

 

Page 5 – Deaths – Column 2

 

Elisha Williams        Augt 17 in 1811 62 yrs old

Sarah Williams        26th Feby 1851             95

Sallie P. Williams    departed this life the 19th January 1859

William Williams      departed this life March 6, 1862

 

Evander M. Williams          December 29, 1853

 

Want to see copies of the actual Will Williams'family bible pages? Click here to read a pdf file with pages from that bible. It's a big file so be patient as it downloads.