Williams Family

Home. .Williams Family Tree. .Reference Info. .Mississippi County AR. .Early Halifax NC. .Early Nashville TN. .John Williams (1). .Richard Williams (2). .Littletown. .Joshua Williams (3). .Maps. .Historical North Carolina Maps . .Two Elishas (a). .Two Elishas (b). .Elisha Williams (4). .Couer de Leon Thoroughbred. .Scotland Neck Trinity Church. .Betsy Williams (5). .William Williams (5). .John Wharton Williams (6). . Elisha Williams II (5). .Josiah Frederick Williams (5). .Ewing Family. .Milbrey Horn Williams (6). .Joseph Philips Williams (6). .Rebecca Philips Williams (6). .Rowena Josey Williams (6). .Elisha Williams (6). .James H. Williams (6). .Edward H. Williams (7). .Sallie Williams Cartwright (7). .Edward James Williams (8). .Frank D. Williams(8) . .Nelle Francis Williams (8). .Henry P. Williams (6). .Sarah Elizabeth Williams (6). .Mary Thomas "Money" Williams (6). .John Maxey Williams (6). .Martha M. Williams (6). .Margaret Williams (6). . Mama Nelle and Pop . . Joseph D. Philips . . Sylvan Hall Cemetery . .Contacts. Larry's Home Page

.Elizabeth "Betsy" Norfleet Hunter Williams (5).

Elizabeth "Betsy" Norfleet Hunter Williams is a daughter of Elisha Williams and Sarah Josey

When my great-grandfather's great-grandfather, Elisha Williams and his wife, Sarah Josey, decided to move from Franklin County NC to Nashville TN about 1804,  their married daughter Betsy stayed behind in NC while the rest of the family made the move to Tennessee. 
 
Betsy first married Joseph John Williams on 11 Feb 1797.  I believe that they lived in the house below in Halifax County NC which was built for them near his father's brick house which he later inherited and which burned.   The house is named White Rock Plantation.  It is still owned by descendants of Betsy and is listed in the Register of National Historic Places.

Picture taken in 2013

This is the original kitchen used by the slaves to feed the inhabitants of the White Rock house close by.  Picture taken in 2013.
Thomas C. Williams restored the home in 1915 and is buried on the property.

The below document was taken from the application for inclusion in the national Register of Historic Places.  It contains detail information about the White Rock Plantation as well as detailed information about the Williams family, going back to Betsy Williams and beyond.

White Rock Plantation NatRegOfHistPlacesNew by Larry Feldhaus

Betsy Williams'  husband John Joseph Williams died young.  On 3 Feb 1818 at Halifax, North Carolina.  she married the widower, Lemuel James Alston, who had been  married to her husband's sister.
 
Betsy returned with him to his plantation in Clarke County Alabama where she lived with him until he died in 1836.  I believe they returned to North Carolina frequently and may have maintained property there.
 
Afterwards she returned to North Carolina where she lived with the widow of her son Joseph John Williams, Mary Kearney Davis, until she died on 31 Jan 1864.

A seldom mentioned fact about Eisha Williams' family is the marriage of his son Elisha II's daughter's sister-in-law, Sarah Childress, to President James K. Polk in Murfreesboro TN and the marriage of his daughter Betsy's grandaughter, Lucy Eugenia Williams, to William Hawkins Polk, the President's brother, in Warren County NC. 

james_k_polk_and_sarah_c_polk.jpg

President James K. Polk
and wife

wmhawkinspolk.jpg

brother of the President
and husband of
Lucy Eugenia Williams

William Hawkins Polk attended the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill NC.  During the time he was there he corresponded with his older brother James K. Polk and those letters have been preserved and published by The North Carolina Historical Review.  See the publication below.

Wm H Polk at UNC.pdf by Larry Feldhaus

1. ELISABETH "BETSY" NORFLEET HUNTER5 WILLIAMS (ELISHA4, JOSHUA3, RICHARD2, JOHN1) was born 06 Mar 1778 in Halifax County NC, and died 31 January 1864.  She married (1) JOSEPH JOHN WILLAMS in NC. He was born Abt. 1790 in Prob. Halifax, NC, and died Aft. Jan 1808 in Halifax, NC. She married (2) LEMUEL JAMES ALSTON.

More About ELISABETH "BETSY" NORFLEET HUNTER WILLIAMS:

Notes for JOSEPH JOHN WILLAMS:

Nov, Ct. 1808  Will posted in records compiled by Margaret Hoffmann for Halifax Co., NC.

Will #768 2 Aug 1807, Nov. Ct. 1808. wife BETSY NORFLEET HUNTER WILLIAMS every negro and increase that came to me by her also my household goods etc.,and my extras. to move her to her father's (name not given) if she wishes to move plantations to be kept and negroes hired out until children (names not given ) are of age my father (name not given) to make my children a right to my land.

Wit.: Not given  Extrs. and Guardians to my children: My brother WILILAMS WILLIAMS and JAMES HARRISS

Codicil: this 22 Jan 1808 my wife to have an equal share of my crop with the children  Wit." not given

Probate indicates will proved by JAMES HARRISS, JOSEPH GEE, MARK HARWELL and ISHAM MATHEWS

Children of ELISABETH "Betsy" Norfleet Hunter WILLIAMS and JOSEPH WILLAMS are:

i. JAMES CONNOR WILLIAMS, b. 1 Jan 1798; d. 1813

ii. JOSEPH JOHN WILLAMS, b. 19 Aug 1800; d. 13 Apr 1833

    Married Mary Kearney Davis 5 Feb 1820

    Children:

         Mary Elizabeth Williams, b. 13 Nov 1822 in White Rock, Halifax, NC

          Joseph John Williams, b. 27 Aug 1824 in White Rock, Halifax, NC

           Thomas Calvin Williams, b. 30 Dec 1828 in White Rock, Halifax, NC

           Lucy Eugenia Williams, b. 10 Oct 1826 in White Rock, Halifax, NC

               Married:  William Hawkins Polk, b. 24 May 1815 in Maury Co., TN. 

                                                              d. 1862 in Nashville, TN

                   Children:

                         William Polk

                         Tasker Polk

iii. ELIZABETH ALSTON WILLAMS, b. 6 Sep 1803; d. 2 Dec 1830

Warrenton, Warren County, NC
 

marykwilliamshouse.jpg
Mary K. Williams' Town House

Green-Polk-McAuslan House
Also known as "The Polk House"

From The Warren Record
 
Posted: Wednesday, March 28, 2012 8:23 am | Updated: 8:26 am, Wed Mar 28, 2012.

The Preservation Warrenton 2012 Spring Homes Tour will be held Saturday, April 28 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, April 29 from 1 to 5 p.m. The theme is “Architectural Reflections: Building Styles in Warren County, NC.”

Among the 14 homes and churches on the tour is the Green-Polk-McAuslan House. It is located on North Main Street, across the street from The Ivy. It is a rare example of a brick Jacob Holt house. Planter Nathaniel Green purchased the land in 1850 and began work on the structure. The bricks were made on the construction site. Holt used large eight-over-eight windows on this Greek Revival house.

According to Lizzie Montgomery in “Sketches of Old Warrenton North Carolina,” Major Green was a very hospitable man. He built two houses as guesthouses for his guests. One that he built was across North Main Street from his residence. His guests had their sleeping apartments there and came over to his house for meals. In the 20th century, the Tarwater family owned it and resided there. He also built a house on the corner of North Main Street and Academy Street that he used to house additional guests. In the 20th century, Dr. and Mrs. P.J. Macon resided there. Later, John Bruce Bell and his wife Ann Crinkley Bell purchased it and lived there.

Mrs. Montgomery also wrote that Nat Green was a free-spending man and soon had many debts. In 1856, the house was sold to Mary Kearney Davis Williams (widow of John Joseph Williams), owner of Montmorenci, a large plantation and house in Warren County. The Warrenton house became the family’s town house.

Montmorenci was a plantation between Lickskillet and Highway 401 in the Shocco community. It was built by General William “Pretty Billy” Williams in 1822. Family history claims that General Lafayette stayed at Montmorenci during his 1825 tour of the United States. After her husband, John Joseph Williams, died, Mary Kearney Davis Williams moved into town.

Montmorenci no longer exists. It was dismantled with portions of the house, including its spectacular staircase, placed in the Dupont family museum, Winterthur, in Wilmington, Del. A large stone from Montmorenci is in the back yard of the Polk House. It was used to hold up a column at Montmorenci.

Mary Kearney Davis Williams’ daughter Lucy Eugenia married Major William Hawkins Polk of Tennessee, brother of President James Knox Polk. When Major Polk died in the Civil War, Lucy moved into Warrenton with her mother. She brought her two children, William and Tasker, with her.

Mrs. Montgomery wrote: “Lucy was very pretty as a young woman, with charming manners, and was much admired. She was a fine conversationalist. Having been much impressed and influenced by a mother who was loyal and devoted to the tenets of the Methodist Church, she never danced, but on occasions of dances and balls, you would see her surrounded by young men, quite as eager to enjoy her society as others were to engage in the dance.”

Her son Tasker and his wife, Lilie Jones Polk, were the next generation to live in the Green-Polk_McAuslan house. He was a poet, a prominent attorney, and North Carolina State Senator for several consecutive terms.

Tasker’s two sons also lived in the Green-Polk-McAuslan house. The first was William (Bill), an attorney and writer. He also was mayor of Warrenton. His friendship with Thomas Wolfe lasted after both attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Harvard. Wolfe visited him in the Polk House. He had two daughters, Catherine and Marion, or Marnie.

When William left Warrenton to become editor of The Greensboro Daily News, his younger brother James Knox, a Warrenton merchant, and his family moved into the house. He and his wife, Anne Hunter Fishel of Vaughan, had two children, Tasker and Anne Knox.

Tasker also had two daughters. One was Fairfax, who married John Mitchell, a Warrenton banker. The other, Mary, wrote in her memoir, “The Way We Were,” about marrying attorney Frank Gibbs in the Polk house.

Today, Mary’s nephew, Tasker Polk of New Bern, and the British crown colony of Gibraltar, plans to follow in the footsteps of his aunt Mary. He will marry Katherine Robinson of New Bern, and Charleston, S.C., in the Green-Polk-McAuslan House on May 19.

The current owner of the house is Mary Tasker Polk Gibbs McAuslan, Tasker Polk’s granddaughter. She will be joined on the homes tour by other grandchildren, all former residents of the home.

The house was open for the 1995 Jacob Holt House Foundation Homes Tour, but this is the first time it has been open for a Preservation Warrenton Homes Tour. I am indebted to Tasker Polk and Noel Robertson who contributed to this article.

Advance tickets for the tour only on Saturday and Sunday are $20. Tickets are available the day of the tour for $25 at the Jacob Holt House on South Bragg Street in Warrenton. Advance tickets for the tour and lunch at Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church on the corner of North Main Street and Church Street in Warrenton held on Saturday only are $32.

The below reference is to Betsy's daughter, Elizabeth Alston Williams, whose portrait also appears below. 

The General William "Pretty Boy" Williams was the brother of Betsy's first husband, Joseph John Williams.  He built the mansion in Shocco Springs NC, Montmorenci, which passed to the widow of Betsy's son, Joseph John Williams.

We find Betsy living there in the 1860 federal census with her daughter-in-law Mary Kearney Davis Williams. 

Charles Willson Peale with Patron and Populace. A Supplement to "Portraits and Miniatures by Charles Willson     Peale". With a Survey of His Work in Other Genres.  By Charles Coleman Sellers; Charles Willson Peale, Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, New Ser., Vol. 59, No. 3. (1969), pp. 1-146. 

WILLIAMS, ELIZABETH ALSTON

Correction, PGM, 871.

SP 146, 83. The staff of the Frick Art Reference Library, to whom the author of this work and its predecessor is so largely indebted, has identified Peale's portrait of "Miss Eliza Williams," niece of "Gen. Williams," not as Elizabeth Cook Williams (1813-1890) who married Richard Cooke Tilghman, but as Elizabeth Alston Williams (1803-1830), a girl of nineteen at the time of the painting. She was a daughter of Joseph John Williams, I1 (1775-1808), and Elizabeth Norfleet Hunter (1778-1864)) who by a second marriage became the wife of Lemuel James Alston. Elizabeth herself, in her short life, was twice married, first to Harry Thorne, and second to Nicholas Drake.

Her uncle, the General Williams with whom she was traveling through Philadelphia in the summer of 1822, was not Otho Holland Williams (q.v., P&M 985-987), but General William Williams of "Montmorenci," Warren Co., N.C., remembered by the engaging soubriquet of "Pretty Billy." Peale's letters confirm this identification by a reference to the family "in Carolina." The painting had been "nearly finished" on June 9, and "just finished" on the fourteenth. 1822. Canvas, 283 X 234. Half length. Brown hair with a tortoise shell comb. Brown eyes. Light blue dress, ruffled lace collar and gold necklace. Basket of cherries under her hand. Brown chair, on which is draped a rose-red scarf with a border of roses and green leaves. Brown background with a column at the left. Mrs. Frank H. Gibbs, Warrenton, N. C. (Desc.)"

 

 

Winterthur was home and hobby to Henry Francis du Pont, a superb landscaper and the world's most prodigious collector of American decorative arts made or used in this country from 1640 to 1860. As museums go Winterthur is still in its infancy and is not as widely known as might be expected given the premier quality of its contents and its gardens. www.winterthur.org

Du Pont inherited the original 18th-century country house in 1927, transformed it into a 175-room home and moved out in 1951 when it became a museum. He bought facades and entire rooms of gracious American residences and restored and installed them here. Du Pont then filled the quarters with appropriate furniture, art and accessories. He purchased entire portions of the house of a Philadelphia mayor, a Pennsylvania Dutch farm, a 19th-century Delaware inn named the Red Lion and the family room of a 17th-century Essex, Massachusetts dwelling. A free-standing staircase and several rooms at Winterthur had originally been part of an estate called Montmorenci in North Carolina.

This is the restored staircase that was in Montmorenci, Shocco Springs, NC.  It is located in the DuPont home ,Winterthur, in Wilmington, DE which is now a museum.  The picture on the right was done during the installation at Winterthur.

Below is a picture of Montmorenci taken in 1938 after much of the house had been stripped of anything of value by Henry F. DuPont.  Read about the process as written by his daughter in a book she wrote about him and his house, Winterthur.
 
Below that is house of a similar style that is currently for sale in the same area where Montmorenci was located.
 
If you are curious about where the name "Montmorenci" came from, read this article about the French family Montmorenci.

The picture below was taken by DuPont's crew prior to removing anything from the house.

 

Whitsome (the Coleman-White House) is a rare surviving example of the unique “montmorenci" school" of Federal style architecture renowned in Warren and Halifax counties. It stands on a spacious and attractive lot in the historic small town of  Warrenton.

 

Built between 1821 and 1824, the elegant, livable, and beautifully preserved house displays the hallmarks of the regional style named after the famous lost plantation house,  Montmorenci—the premier example whose stair and other woodwork are in the Winterthur Museum in Delaware.

 

 Whitsome's front façade features the only surviving Montmorenci-style windows—a distinctive Palladian-inspired design with decorative blind arches and pilasters separating the central and flanking window elements. The Palladian theme also defines the central doorways at both levels, which are enriched with fanlights and intricate carved moldings typical of the Montmorenci school.

 

 

Inside, the central hall and flanking rooms continue the Federal style elegance. Complementing the simply treated stair, the woodwork of mantels, wainscoting, chair rails, and door frames features reeding and gougework rosettes, garlands, and cable moldings. Most striking is the ornate plaster work in the hall and main parlor, with central medallions and cornices featuring rich acanthus, modillions, and floral designs.  In excellent condition, Whitsome has been meticulously maintained for comfortable living and offers a broad rear porch and full basement.

Mrs. Mary K. Williams is the owner of the Montmorenci in 1858 according to Wharton Jackson Green's book, and it seems likely she is the same one living with Betsy N.H. Williams Alston in the 1860 census. Mary Kearney Williams was the wife of Betsy's son John Joseph Williams, Jr.and General "Pretty Billy" Williams was the brother of Betsy's first husband, John Joseph Williams.
 
William "Pretty Billy" Williams married 4 times. Not sure when he died, but he was born in 1771 and married the last time in 1826 at the age of 55. He was probably dead by 1860. He was willed the following as a young man:

WILL-EXECUTOR: NCHAL-WL1 p. 139; brother, Joseph John Williams, Jr. dated 2 Aug. 1807, ALSO: brother-in-law, James Harris.

WILL LEGATEE: NCHAL-WL1 pp. 165-166; father, Joseph John Williams dated 15 Feb 1816, given 800-900 acres of land joining Sharrod Bobbet, Moseley and Butterwood Swamp, father's plantation, other lands in Halifax and Warren Counties, furniture, slaves and other items.
 
 
"Pretty Billy" Williams built Montmorenci in 1825 and it was located half way between Shocco Springs and Jones Red and White Sulfur Springs. Both springs are shown in the 1874 Warren County map below, one on each side of Shocco Creek.
 
The Manly Wade Wellman book shows:
 
"#38 is labeled as the site of the old Shocco Springs Hotel (1815-1875).

#36 is labeled as the site of the Jones' White Sulphur Springs Hotel (1810-1875)."
 
"these locations are not far from what is known today as the "Vicksboro" Community which is found right on the Vance/Warren line - southeastern Vance/southwestern Warren. You'll see Shocco Creek near" Notice on the map below that the Shocco Creek runs just above Vicksboro to the right.
 
"Shocco Springs: former health resort in south Warren County on Shocco Creek. Located approx. 9 mi. south of the city of Warrenton, it was famous in the nineteenth century as a social, recreational, and health resort built around mineral springs. Shocco Male Academy was located here. Neither is in existence any longer. Shocco Springs had a post office from 1832 until 1866"
 
 
he says "I found a letter, however, directing me to join them at the North Carolina "White Sulphur," or famous old "Shocco."", obviously speaking of the two hotels above. From the map below you can see that Vicksboro is near Shocco Creek which crosses highway 410 about 9 miles south of Warrenton as indicated above. I have always thought that Elisha Williams lived in the area of the yellow line in the map below where Shocco Creek forms the border between Franklin and Warrenton counties, primarily because he owned land in both counties and lived on Shocco Creek. His family is recorded in Franklin County in the 1800 federal census and that is the only part of the Shocco Creek that borders Franklin County.
 

Wharton Jackson Green goes on to say "After the summer season was over, my father engaged the famous old Montmorenci, belonging to a particular friend, Mrs. Mary K. Williams, where the intervening cold seasons were passed until my wedding day rolled around on the 4th of May, 1858."

 

The Treasure House of Early American Rooms book:

 

says "Montmorenci, a famous house built at Shocco Springs, near Warrenton, North Carolina, about 1822 by General William Williams" and puts the location of Montmorenci in Shocco Springs. Other references indicate it is located SW of Warrenton. The book goes on to say:

 

"The graceful free-hanging staircase dominating the Montmorenci Stair Hall was formerly the outstanding feature of Montmorcnci, a famous house built at Shocco Springs, near Warrenton, North Carolina about 1822 by General William Williams.

Lafayette, on his tour of the United States in 1824 to 1825, was entertained at Montmorenci, and here a later owner's daughter, Lucy Williams, was married to the brother of President James Knox Polk. The staircase was probably made by a North Carolina craftsman, but whether it was designed by a professional architect is not known. It resembles the design for an "elliptical stairs" illustrated in Peter Nicholson's The Carpenter's New Guide, a builder's handbook first published in London in 1792 and widely used in America during the first half of the nineteenth century. Gouge carving and finely molded plasterwork, probably made in Philadelphia and bearing a resemblance to the work of Robert Wellford, reflect the refined taste of the Federal period.

Augmenting the architectural splendor is furniture by skilled craftsmen of the early Republic. The mahogany and satinwood chairs and settees, upholstered in old green silk, represent the product of John Seymour and his son Thomas, who worked in Boston from 1796 into the early years of the nineteenth century.

The octagonal sewing table between the side chairs is a further example of the Seymour furniture, which is unmatched for its delicacy of form and exquisitely detailed inlay. Also in the room, and illustrative of the French influence on American decorative art at this time, is a mahogany and satinwood pier table, bearing the label of Charles Honore Lannuier, a French emigre cabinetmaker who worked at 6o Broad Street, New York, from 1805 until 1819. Looking glasses, gilded and embellished with delicate foliage motifs popular in the Federal period, reflect the light of candles held in late-eighteenth-century candelabra and sconces of cut glass.

Chinese export porcelain, imported in quantities in Amcrican ships, is represented by punch bowls on the side tables and pistol-handled urns elsewhere in the room. A portrait of Catherine Browne, of New York, sometimes called the "tragic Kate Browne," hangs above the settee. On the floor are Persian Feraghan carpets dating from the early nineteenth century. The spindles of the stair railing and the soft moldings of the soft moldings of the plaster cornice cast numerous shadows around the room. Mahogany paneled doors from Montmorenci contrast with the ivory-colored walls.

In the Montmarenci Stair Hall are porcelain punch bowls and ornamental urns made in China for export to the West. Among them is a pistol handled urn patterned after a model first executed at the Marieherg factory in Sweden and representative of many made for the American market."

The Treasurehouse of Early American Rooms book contains this picture of the staircase in the Montmorenci house and the items described in the last paragraph above are shown in the picture.

Shocco Springs is shown In the 1874 Warren County NC map below just below the "S" in Shocco.  Click on the map for a larger version in a new window where several Williams are listed, along with a "Williams Bridge" and a Dr. Williams Bridge".  This map also shows at least one Alston property.  The map, and others, can be viewed in more detail by clicking on the link Warren County 1874 map.

Elizabeth “Betsy” Norfleet Hunter Williams Alston

Daughter of Elisha Williams and Sarah Josey

8 February 2008

In the 1860 Federal Census B. N. H. Alston, age 81, is living with M. K. Williams in Warren county, NC.  We know that two years earlier Betsy N. H. Williams Alston was living with her daughter-in-law Mary Kearney Davis Williams at Montmorenci near Shocco Springs in Warren County.

Betsy’s daughter, Elizabeth Alston Williams Drake had died in 1830 and her son, Joseph John Alston had died in 1833.  Her only other child, James Conner Williams appears to have died young.  All this is based on the bible records below.  She did have grandchildren living in 1860.

Did Betsy marry Lemuel James Alston on 3 Feb 1818 after his first wife died there and move with him to southern Alabama? 

If so, it appears from the census records below that she moved back to North Carolina after he died in 1836 and lived with her widowed daughter-in-law, Mary Kearney Davis Williams, in 1840, disappears in 1850, and back with Mary K. Davis Williams in 1860.

The following is from U. S. Census records on Ancestry.com

Warren County NC 1860

M. K. Williams, age 57, Female
B. N. H. Alston, age 81, Female
F. Bennett, age 65, Female

 

Warren County NC 1850

M. K. Williams, age 47, Female
Lucy E. Williams, age 20, Female

Halifax NC 1840

Mary Williams,                              1 male 10 to under 15                  Thomas Calvin age 12 ?

                                                      1 male 15 to under 20                   Joseph John age 16 ?

                                                      1 female 10 to under 15                 Lucy age 14 ?

                                                      1 female 15 to under 20                 Mary Elizabeth age 18 ?

                                                      1 female 30 to under 40                 Mary K. Williams age 38 ?          

                                                      1 female 60 to under 70                 Betsy N. H. Williams age 62

CHAPTER XXV

THE HOMES OF OLD WARRENTON

THE HOME OF MAJOR "NAT" GREEN

The home of Tasker Polk, one of the handsomest and most attractive places in the old town, was built by Major Green, brother of General Jeff Green, about 1850. He moved from his "Nut Bush" plan­tation into the town to secure better educational ad­vantages for his three sons and one daughter, Fanny. Major Green had two marriages, the first with Miss Katherine Somerville, and the second with Miss Lucy Alston, sister of Dr. "Jim" Alston, of Warren County. There were two daughters by the last marriage.

Dr. Solomon Green married his cousin, gate Au­brey Somerville, of Tennessee. He lived in Mem­phis and practiced medicine some years. The other sons lost their lives in the Confederate service by fever and wounds.

Major Green moved to Memphis to live just be­fore the War Between the States. In, 1863 Miss Fanny came through the lines to Warrenton and lived in the home of her cousins, the family of Mr. John Somerville, until this home was broken up by the death of Mrs. Somerville, when she was invited to make her home at Esmeralda the country place of Colonel Wharton Green, her first cousin. While living there she married her cousin, James B. Somer­ville. Some few years after her marriage they moved to Warrenton, and bought the William Eaton, Jr., home, where they resided until they died, he in 1898, and she five years later.

Mrs. Somerville, "Miss Fanny," in her early young ladyhood, was perhaps the best known and the most popular woman in the town and county, her manner springing from a kind heart, and was so genial and sympathetic that she drew man, woman and child to her with warm affection. She was a delightful talker and most charming companion. She had the won­derful, and rare gift, of remembering every family connection in the county, and she could always set you straight as to your "kin-folks.". She was of medium height, very slender and graceful figure, a perfect brunette, and in her young days she was considered the most graceful dancer of her social set. Her entire life was spent in cheerful and brave service for others. She was a consistent and devoted member of the Episcopal Church.

Major Green was a man of large means but very much in debt. He was a most hospitable gentleman. His home, a large brick house, was too small to ac­commodate his guests and so he built the house across the street, known as the Parker Place, where his friends had their sleeping apartments; they came over to the main residence for meals. As might have been foreseen, Major Green's financial affairs came to a crisis several years before the war. His removal to Memphis to live soon followed. What was left of his estate of negroes, goods, and chattels, he sent by wagon to one of his plantations in Arkansas, un­der the care of a former overseer. In Memphis his agent and overseer made over a good deal of the property entrusted to his care to a commission mer­chant of that city, the transaction being alleged by Major Green as fraudulent. At that time, for lack of proof of fraud, no attempt was made by law to recover the property or its value. More than twenty years after the transaction, the overseer, on his death-bed, sent for Dr. Sol Green, the oldest son of the Major, a practicing physician in Memphis, and made a full confession of his fraudulent conduct and furnished documentary evidence concerning the transaction. Major Green, in 1874, in Memphis, commenced an action against the commission mer­chant for the recovery of the value of the property. He was introduced as a witness in the case and had testified, while introducing the documentary evidence, to matters making clear the liability of the defendant, when a telegram was received by him to the effect that his married daughter, living a few miles in the country, was extremely sick and his presence was needed. The Judge adjourned the court until the next morning, to give the witness an opportunity to visit his daughter. After he left the railway and was on his way to the home of the sick daughter in a buggy, the horse took fright and he was thrown out, receiving such injuries as to cause his death in a few hours. That tragic event put an end to the suit, as the Major had not been cross-examined and there was no living witness to supply the necessary facts.

After Major Green went to Tennessee to live, Mrs. Mary K. Williams bought the house and moved there to live in the early fifties. She had resided at a beautiful country home some ten miles from War­renton, called "Montmorenci." As all three of her children had married, Thomas Williams, Mrs. Peter Hawkins, and Mrs. W. H. Polk, she and her mother-­in-law, Mrs. Williams, then a very old lady, lived there alone, except in the sessions of the schools when her grandchildren, Mollie and Lucy Hawkins, and Joe and Mollie Boyd Williams, and some of her nieces and nephews, came in and became a part of her household. Her daughter, Lucy, had married Major William H. Polk, brother of President James K. Polk, and they resided in Columbia, Tennessee. He died in 1559, and then she came with her two young children, William and Tasker, and made her home permanently with her mother.

Mrs. Polk was very pretty as a young woman, with charming manners, and was much admired. She was a fine conversationalist. Having been much im­pressed and influenced by a mother who was loyal and devoted to the tenets of the Methodist Church, she never danced, but on occasions of dances and balls, you would see her surrounded by young men, quite as eager to enjoy her society as others were to engage in the dance. She was all through life a loyal friend and a most devoted mother.

Hon. Tasker Polk, with his family, Mrs. Polk, (Miss Lilie Jones, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Jones, of Warren County) and their two sons now reside in this place. Their two daughters, Mary and Lucy, have married. The oldest son, William, is a practicing lawyer and associated with his father, who has been a prominent and successful lawyer in the old town for nearly forty years. Mr. Polk has also faithfully and ably represented his county in the State Senate for successive terms. The youngest son, James, is a student at the State Uni­versity.

CHAPTER XXXVII

PROFESSIONAL MEN OF WARRENTON

LAWYERS

William H. Polk, son of William H. Polk, of Tennessee, was born in Columbia, Tennessee, in 1855. Upon the death of his father in 1862, his mother, born Miss Lucy Williams, brought him and his brother, Tasker, to Warrenton, her old home. He practiced his profession in Warrenton during the years 1882-1886. He then went to Birmingham, Alabama, where he died a short time thereafter.

Tasker Polk, the brother of William, was born in Columbia, Tennessee, in 1860. He was licensed to practice law in 1880 and is still engaged in the ex­tensive practice of his profession at Warrenton. He was a member of the Senate of North Carolina in 1915.

There were many marriages between the Williams, Alstons, Davis' and Kearneys in Warren and Franklin Counties NC in the 1800s.  The house below is still standing, as are all the others shown below.  It belonged to Robert Webb Williams and his wife Heartwell H. Davis.  Robert is a second cousin of the Joseph John Williams who was married to Elizabeth Norfleet Hunter Williams.

vinehill.jpg

 Vine Hill Plantation
Franklin County NC
 
Ruina Temporance Williams was the daughter of Robert Webb Williams (1792-1822) and Hartwell Hodges Davis (1793-1868) the owners of Vine Hill Plantation in Franklin County. Robert W. Williams was the son of William Williams (1760-1838) and Elizabeth Kinchen Kearney (1769-1863). William Williams was the son of Solomon Williams (ca 1723-1794) and Temporance Boddie (d. May 11, 1784). Solomon Williams was the son of Samuel Williams (ca 1695-1753) and Elizabeth Alston (ca 1700-aft 1792). Ruina's brother, was Robert Edgar Williams, owner of Myrtle Lawn Plantation. Ruina's aunt, Marina P. Williams, was married to George Washington Alston and was the owner of Cherry Hill Plantation.

Marina Priscilla Williams is a brother of Robert Webb Williams above and married George Washington Alston.  They built the house below known as Cherry Hill.  It's located in Warren County NC.

cherryhill-gate.jpg

Cherry Hill Plantation

Located at:
2740 NC Highway 58

Warrenton, North Carolina

Built in 1858 by John A. Waddell, the house is a part of the National Register of Historic Places

Cherry Hill Plantation was the property of George Washington Alston (1801-1849)who left the land to his wife's care when he died. His wife, Marina P. Williams- Alston (1810-1897), whom he had married February 14, 1829 in Warren County, took over the operation of the plantation and built a new plantation home, which is still standing today in Warren County. George W. Alston was the son of Philip Guston Alston (1762-1820) & Mary Williams Harris, married ca. 1784; Philip G. Alston was the son of Philip Alston (ca.1706-1784) & Winefred Whitmel (1729-1795)married ca. 1745; Philip Alston was the son of John Alston (1670-1758) & Mary (ca. 1700) who had lived in Chowan Co, NC.

Marina P. Williams was the daughter of William Williams (1760 -1838) & his 2nd wife, Elizabeth Kearney (1769-1863) who married December 4, 1790; William Williams was the son of Solomon Williams (ca. 1723 -d. July 29, 1794) & Temperance Boddie (d. May 11, 1784),who married June 23, 1757; Solomon Williams was the son of Samuel Williams (ca.1698-1754) & Elizabeth Alston (ca. 1711-aft.1792) who had lived in Edgecombe Co.,NC.

The owners of this plantation were also associated with the following plantations along with the surnames of their owners: Myrtle Lawn (WILLIAMS) and Tusculum (ALSTON) in Warren County; Linwood Farms (DAVIS), Rocky Hill (THORN) and Vine Hill (DAVIS) in Franklin County.

The daughter of Robert Webb Williams married Samuel Thomas Alston and they built the Tusculum Plantation house in Warren County NC.

tusculum1.jpg

Tusculum Plantation

Located at:
Arcola, Warren County
Built 1830

Tusculum Plantation was owned by Samuel Thomas Alston (1806-1860)and his wife Ruina Temporance Williams (1814-1897) of Warren County, North Carolina. They were married on September 1, 1831, and a few years earlier, in 1825, the ruins of an ancient city had been discovered near Rome, Italy, situated on the edge of an ancient volcano. The city was called Tusculum, which at one time, had been a place favored by wealth Romans and had ben populated with many large villas. No doubt, Samuel had been influenced by the discovery when it came to naming his own plantation, as had several other landowners throughout the South at that time.

Samuel Thomas Alston was the son of Samuel Alston (1770-1807) and Elizabeth Faulcon (1775-1848); Samuel Alston was the youngest son of Philip Alston (1706-1784) and Winifred Whitmel (1729-1795); Philip Alston was the son of John Alston (ca 1670-1758) and Mary Clark (?)(ca 1700).

Ruina Thomas Williams' brother, Robert Edgar Williams, built Myrtle Wood Plantation in Warren County NC.  All of these houses are still standing in 2012.

myrtlelawn.jpg

Myrtle Lawn Plantation
Warren County, North Carolina

Located at:
Inez, Fork Township
Built ca. 1858

Owned by Dr. Robert Edgar Williams (b. Sept. 16, 1817 -d. March 7, 1904) who first lived in Franklin County, NC on land left to him by his grandfather, William Williams (1760-1838), land that had previously been owned by his deceased father, Robert Webb Williams (b. Feb.27-1792-d. Nov. 15, 1822);by 1860, Robert E. had moved to Warren County to be near his widowed grandmother, Elizabeth Kearney Williams (b. May 20-1769 - d. May 22, 1863). It was during this time period that he had the plantation known as Myrtle Lawn constructed, which became his lifetime home.

Robert Edgar Williams was the son of Robert Webb Williams (1792-1822) & Harty Hodges Davis (1793-1868), who had married on October 1812. He married on October 20, 1841 in Warren Co., to Valeria Virginia Kearney (b. Dec. 7, 1822-d. Nov. 7, 1907),the daughter of William Kinchen Kearney (1785-1869) & Mariah Hardy Alston (1793-1883) who had married July 22, 1810. Robert W. Williams was the son of William Williams (1760-1838) & Elizabeth Kearney (1769- 1863): William Williams was the son of Solomon Williams (d.July 28, 1794) & Temporance Boddie (d.May 11, 1784), who married June 23, 1757, the family lived in Halifax Co., NC. Solomon Williams was the son of Samuel Williams (ca.1698-1754) & Elizabeth Alston (ca.1700-1792/1805),who married ca. 1718; they lived in Bertie Co., and later in Edgecombe. Elizabeth Alston was the daughter of John Alston (ca.1670-1758) & his wife, Mary (b.ca.1680). After the death of Samuel in 1754 Edgecombe County, Elizabeth married on Sept. 17, 1765 to Richard Burt, their long-time neighbor, who was also a widower; Elizabeth & Richard Burt lived in Halifax Co., where he died in 1805.

 

 

The following web site says that Elizabeth Williams, daughter of Col. Joseph John Williams and wife Rosanna Conner, married Judge Lemuel Alston, born 1760, and she died before 15 Feb 1816.

 

It also says Judge Lemuel James Alston married Elizabeth Norfleet Hunter Williams, daughter of Elisha Williams and Sarah Josey, on 3 Feb 1818 at Halifax NC and he died in 1836 in Alabama.

Descendants Chart of John Alston of North Carolina

Questions, comments email at

fkroots@aol.com

http://hometown.aol.com/vafdking/alston.htm

 

  4.   JOSEPH JOHN WILLIAMS COL married ROSANNA CONNER at of, Edgecombe, North  Carolina. He was born at Edgecombe, North Carolina. He  married ELIZABETH  MATILDA ALSTON, daughter of PHILIP ALSTON SR  and  WINIFRED WHITMELL, in 1770 at Bute, North Carolina. He died after 15  Feb  1816 at Halifax, North Carolina.

 

i)   ELIZABETH  WILLIAMS married LEMUEL JAMES ALSTON JUDGE,  son  of SOLOMON  ALSTON JR and SARAH HINTON, at of, Halifax, North Carolina.  She  was  born  at Halifax, North Carolina. She died before  15  Feb 1816.

 

 

a)   LEMUEL JAMES ALSTON JUDGE married ELIZABETH WILLIAMS,  daughter of  JOSEPH  JOHN WILLIAMS COL and ELIZABETH MATILDA ALSTON,  at  of,  Halifax,  North Carolina. He was born in 1760 at North Carolina.  He  married  ELIZABETH  NORFLEET  HUNTER WILLIAMS,  daughter  of  ELISHA  WILLIAMS  and SARAH JOSEY, on 3 Feb 1818 at Halifax, North Carolina.  He died in 1836 at Alabama.

 

 

From the below paragraphs we learn that Lemuel James Alston moved to southern Alabama in 1816 where he died in 1836.  He had eight children and was survived by one son, Col W. W. Alston, who was born in 1799 in South Carolina.  From his age at death we can infer that Lemuel James Alston was born in 1760.

 

 

Dr. Alfred A. Alston, the youngest of the famly, was about one year of age at the time of his mother’s death.  He was for some years a student at the Grove Hill Academy.  He was a very pleasant and winsome boy, although occasionally wayword.  He had a quick memory, was an excellent declaimer, and a bright, attractive scholar, generous and kind, and intelligent.  He studied medicine, married Miss Ulmer, one of the beautiful girls of C1arksville, and at length removed to Texas.  He is now living in the town of Paris, in the county of Lamar.

 

Dr. Lemuel L. Alston, the only brother remaining in the state of Alabama, settIed at Grove Hill as a physician about 1852.  He had but lately completed his course of study, was very affable and courteous, endowed by nature with a very fine personal appear­ance, and was by culture very polite and refined.  It was soon rnanifest that in his chosen profession he was humane, kind, gentle, and careful.  A more consider­ate and tender family physician none needed to desire. 

 

In the fall of 1854 he was married to Miss Jackson of Gainestown, a daughter of Jamea M. Jackson, and con­tinued to reside at Grove Hill.  Mrs. Alston was found to be a valuable accession to the social life of the town.  In the course of years, one daughter, Mary, and two sons, Lemuel and William gladdened their home, and became attendants of the Grove Hill Sunday school. 

At length Dr. Alston removed from Grove Hill and is now with his wife residing at Orrville.  The children grew up, as the years came rapidly upon them.  Miss Mary was married to Dr. B. P. Heryer, a physician at Tuskaloosa, where they now reside.  The elder son Lemuel Alston, is there also, engaged  in business and William W. Aiston is at this date, (1877) a member of the State University, as a student.

 

Dr. Alston and his estimable wife are left therefore alone in their home in Dallas county, and years are weighing upon them. The meridian of life will soon be passed.

Thus it appears that of the large and wealthy Aiston family no one now remains in the county of Clarke.  The river plantation and the old homestead are in the hands of other and where eleven children sported amid the shades of mulberries and china trees, and gathered the flowers and summer fruits, probably not one of them will ever tread again. But on the records of social life and business and professional life in “old Clarke,” from 1816 lip to about 1866, or for fifty years, the name of Alston is indelibly impressed.

 

Alas for parental hopes! February 22nd 1878, W. W. Alston was shot by a fellow student and almost instantly killed.  President Smith testified: “I believed him to be one of the most fearlest young men in college.  In all my transactions with him, I found him to be extremely honest reliable and trustworthy.”  An­other witness testified; “Alston was sober and gentlemanly — was a member of the church and a Good Templar.

 

 

 

From the below paragraphs we learn that Lemuel James Alston was indeed a very wealthy man, owning more than 10,000 acres, and that he was living in the Greenville NC area earlier than 1788.  We also see that he sold all of his land there in 1815.

 

Excerpts from

History of Greenville County, South Carolina

PLEASANTBURG — EARLY TOWN OF GREENVILLE

Several years before the village of Pleasantburg came into existence, and no doubt before there was a single house upon its future location, there existed somewhat of a community about the present Tanglewood school section.  There, near the present intersection of the White Horse road and state highway No.2 (newly paved road to Easley), was the general store of A. McBeth & Company, which is known to have been doing a flourishing business as early as 1794. 

 

Near the McBeth establishment lived a number of planters and summer residents who had early selected that vicinity because it commanded such an excellent view of the mountains to the north, and was at the same time considered more healthful than other nearby locations on account of its elevation.

 

In 1788 Thomas Brandon conveyed the 400 acres granted to him in 1784 unto Lemuel J. Aiston, who already resided in the county, and was the owner of much land adjoining and near that purchased from Brandon.  It will be recalled that this property included the “Richard Pearis mill site” which was later to become the village of Pleasantburg, now Greenville.  Aiston was a man of wealth and great political influence, and no doubt for this reason the commissioners who had been appointed to select a site for the location of a court house in Greenville County chose the eastern side of Reedy river near the Pearis mill site. 

 

And here started the first “real estate development project” in the county, when in 1797 was laid out the town of Pleasantburg by Aiston, upon the lands which he had purchased from Colonel Brandon…………………But near the present High School Building, which was then outside the village, stood the beautiful home of Lemuel J. Aiston, which was said to be the most elaborate residence in the entire up-country, and leading from it to the village was a wide avenue (now West McBee) lined on either side by trees.

 

Alston was the owner of more than 10,000 acres of land which he very successfully cultivated with slaves. About him and his magnificent home, where well-stocked cellars could always be found, revolved the social life of early Greenville and its surrounding plantations.

A very good picture of the impression made upon a stranger by the village during its babyhood may be had by reading an extract from the diary of Edward Hooker, a native of Connecticut, who paid Greenville a visit in 1806. He says:             “Approaching the village of Greenville, we pass in view of Chancellor Thomson’s (Thompson) seat—quite retired in the woods, about two miles from the Court House. Arrived at Col. Alston’s about 12. His seat is without exception the most beautiful that I have seen in South Carolina.

 

The mansion is on a commanding eminence which he calls Prospect Hill. Fronts the village of Greenville from which it is distant just six hundred yards; and to which there is a spacious and beautiful avenue leading, formed by two rows of handsome sycamore trees planted twenty four feet apart—the avenue being 15 rods wide.

 

In like manner another handsome avenue formed by cutting a passage through the woods leads from the north front of the house to the mountain road, about a quarter of a mile in length. The cultivated grounds lie partly on the borders of the great avenue leading to the village and partly on the borders of Reedy river, south and west of the house.”

 

All who know anything at all of the early history of Greenville have heard the name of Vardry McBee, ancestor of so many, who with himself, have contributed greatly to the upbuilding of Greenville, both city and county. In 1815 he purchased the entire holdings of Lemuel J. Alston, consisting of 11,028 acres in and around the village of Greenville.  Mr. McBee then resided at Lincolnton, North Carolina, and did not move to Greenville till 1835, but almost immediately after his Greenville purchase he set on foot many enterprises which were soon to give a zest of life to the languishing community.  In fact, the advent of Vardry McBee into Greenville marked its real beginning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HISTORIC GREENVILLE TOUR

http://www.greenville.k12.sc.us/league/tour1.html

 

6. PROSPECT HILL, Westfield Street (present day Greenville Water Works office)  

 

Look for the marker and photograph the site of Lemuel Alston's home, "Prospect  Hill". Built around 1788, Alston lived in the house which he later turned into Greenville's first hotel (1815).  He sold the property to Vardry McBee and moved to Alabama.  This house was tom down in 1920 and Greenville High School was built on this site. 

 

 

Greenville

By Piper Peters Aheron

http://books.google.com/books?id=ZrL3WQPHTkoC&pg=PA13&lpg=PA13&dq=alston

+mansion+greenville+sc&source=web&ots=D7QaEtzm8W&sig=JJc8sbPwEfY7lNl64OF-MptQVY0#PPP1,M1

 

 

 

 

When it was constructed in the late 1700s, Prospect Hill sat 600 feet from the main road or Pearis’s Wagon Road, which continued to present-day White Hone Road and into the hillsides of the district.  By the 1900’s, Prospect Hill was located Westfield Street and McBee Avenue. 

Prospect hill also became one of Greenville’s first hotels after Alston sold it to Vardry McBee.  In 1815, Alston relocated to Clarke County. Alabama, where be died in 1836.  In 1835 Vardy McBee finally moved from Lincolnton, North Carolina, to Greenville.  McBee lived in this house until his death in 1864.  In 1920 Prospect Hill was demolished. (Special Collections. South Carolina Library, USC. Columbia.)

 

Great Plains became part of (Greenville County through the Count Court Act of 1 785.  Alston, a visionary, donated some land for the construction of a county courthouse.  He also created a plat and labeled the mapped area Pleasantburg, a village that would divide the county in an effort to honor the General, Nathaneal Greene. 

 

North of the hamlet’s log courthouse were the foothills called the Dirk Corner.   Southward lay the Possum Kingdom, flatlands best utilized for farming.  Greenville, both county and city, had been organized, with Greenville the beneficiaryof low country merchant’s dealings.  Coastal plantation owners began to vacation at local mineral springs while drovers pushed herds of cattle, sheep, hogs. and turkeys from Kentucky and Tennessee through Greenville to Charleston. This profitable activity caught the eye of a Lincolnton, North Carolina saddle maker, Vardry McBee.  In 1815 McBee gave Alston $27,554 for the Alston estate, or Prospect Hill.

 

From the below paragraphs we learn that Lemuel James Alston first married Elisabeth, daughter of Col. Joseph John and Elizabeth (Alston) Williams, and a second time Elisabeth, widow of Joseph John Williams, Jr., the half brother of his first wife.  Note the spelling of Elisabeth with an “s” for both the wives with the older Elizabeth spelled with a “z”.  We know Elizabeth N. H. Williams Alston’s name was spelled with a “z” and likely his first wife as well since her grandmother’s name was Elizabeth.

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume IA
Alston, Willis

ALSTON, Lemuel James, representative, was born in Granville county, N.C., in 1760; son of Solomon Alston, grandson of Solomon and Nancy (Hinton) Alston, and great-grandson of John and Mary (Clark) Alston. John Alston was a native of Bedfordshire, England, and settled in North Carolina about 1711.

Lemuel removed to what is now Greenville, S.C., represented that district in the 10th and 11th congresses, serving 1807-11, and removed thence to Clarke county, Ala., in 1816, where he became chief justice, presiding over the Orphans and county courts from 1816 to May 1821.

He married Elisabeth, daughter of Col. Joseph John and Elizabeth (Alston) Williams, and a second time Elisabeth, widow of Joseph John Williams. Jr., the half brother of his first wife.  He died in Clarke County, Ala., in 1836.

 

 

In this article we confirm that Lemuel was born in 1760 and moved to Greenville, South Carolina after the Revolutionary War with ended in 1777 and moved to South Alabama in 1816.

 

ALSTON, Lemuel James

(1760—1836)

ALSTON, Lemuel James, a Representative from South Carolina; born in the eastern part of Granville (now Warren) County, N.C., in 1760; moved to South Carolina after the Revolutionary War and settled near Greens Mill, which soon became the town of Greenville; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Greenville; member of the State house of representatives, 1789-1790; elected as a Republican to the Tenth and Eleventh Congresses (March 4, 1807-March 3, 1811); moved in 1816 to Clarke County, Ala., and settled near Grove Hill, where he presided over the orphans’ court and the county court from November 1816 until May 1821; died at “Alston Place,” Clarke County, Ala., in 1836.

 

From the census record below we can see that Lemuel was living in what is now sourthern Alabama in 1816 with no females in the house.  However, in the following census record we can see that in 1830 he is living with a female between the ages of 50 and 60 at a time when Betsy Norfleet Hunter would have been 52 years of age.   The above record states they married on 3 Feb 1818 in Halifax NC.

 

http://www.trackingyourroots.com/data/1816clrk.htm

 Clarke County Mississippi Territory 1916 Census

 http://www.trackingyourroots.com/data/1816clrk.htm

 Clarke County Mississippi Territory 1916 Census

 The original image is available (if you are a member) at Ancestry.com

http://content.ancestry.com/iexec/?htx=View&r=an&dbid=1125&iid=v229_1- 0377&fn=Lemuel+J&ln=Alstan&st=d&ssrc=&pid=15321

Lemuel J. Alston was the head of household which contained:

 2 White Males over 21

1 White Male under 21

0 White Females

3 Free Persons of Color

83 Slaves

1830 U. S. Census

The original image is available (if you are a member) at Ancestry.com

http://content.ancestry.com/iexec/?htx=View&r=an&dbid=8058&iid=ALM19_2- 0469&fn=Samuel+J&ln=Alston&st=d&ssrc=&pid=1824462

One White Male between the ages of 60 and 70

 

One White Female between the ages of 50 and 60

 

 

This bible was most likely written by Lucy Eugenia Williams who married Maj. William H. Polk, the brother of President Polk.  I base this on the fact that the writer says she is the granddaughter of Elizabeth Norfleet Hunter Williams. 

 

Notice the nickname Betsy for Elizabeth N. H. Williams and the spelling of Elizabeth Williams, the sister of Betsy’s first husband spelled with a “z”. 

 

Betsy’s husband, Joseph John Williams, was born in August 1775 and died 18 September 1808.  So it’s likely that his sister Elizabeth was born sometime around 1775.  If she is the one who married Lemuel James Alston first, then it would have been around 1800.  They had eight children which would have taken about fifteen years. 

 

The timing would be right for her to die before 15 Feb 1816 in South Carolina, Lemuel to move to south Alabama in 1816 and then come back to North Calolina to marry Betsy N. H. Williams, who in 1797 had married Joseph John Willliams who died in 1808.  After all, his first wife was the sister of Betsy’s first husband, so they were family.  When Lemuel died in southern Alabama in 1836 he only had one child living.

 

Lemuel had been living in Greenville, SC since sometime after the Revolutionary War ended in 1777 and before 1788.  He would have been 17 in 1777 and 28 in 1788.  His first wife Elizabeth’s parents were married in 1770 so she likely was born around 1775.

 

Did he return to North Carolina about 1795 when he was 35 and Elizabeth was about 20 and marry her and take her to South Carolina?  After she died about 1815, did he return again and marry his first wife’s sister-in-law, Betsy Williams and move with her to southern Alabama? 

 

When he died, did she come back to North Carolina where she grew up?  Stranger things have happened and the records seem to support this theory.

 

Excerpts from

Williams & Polk Family Bible
Brought in by Mrs. John Mitchell in 1975, Warrenton, N. C.
No pub. Date

 

Births


Jos John Williams Senior Aug. 1775

 

Betsy N. H. Williams Mar. 6, 1778

 

James Conner Williams, son of J. J. Williams & Betsy Jan. 1, 1798

 

Jos John Williams Jr. son of Jos John Williams Senior & Betsey N. H. Williams was born the 19th day of August 1800

 

Elizabeth Alston Williams Sept. 5, 1803

 

Mary Kearney Davis daughter of Archibald & Elizabeth Davis born the 13th of Dec. 1802

 

Deaths

 

Mrs. B. N. H. Alston Jan. 31, 1864

 

Mrs. B. N. H. Alston departed this life on Sunday morning the 31st of January on her 87 year of age 1864

 

Elizabeth Alston Williams Daeke [Drake] Dec. 2, 1830

 

Jos Jon Williams Senior departed this life in his 34th year Sunday Eve 11 oclock 18th Sept. 1808

 

Jos Jon Williams Senior Sept. 18, 1808

 

Jos. John Williams Sen. departed this life on Saturday the 13th of April in his 33rd year 1833

 

Joseph John Williams, son of Jos John Williams & Betsy N. H. Williams Apr. 1833

 

Jos. John Williams Jun. son of Jos. J. Williams Sr. departed this life at Randolph Macon College Wednesday the 15th of March 1843

 

Mary K. Williams departed this life on Sunday Evening about 9 o’ck February 27 in the 85th year of her age 1887

 

Marriages

 

Elisha Williams & Sarah Josey Mar. 24, 1775
(their children were William, Elisha, Josiah, and Elizabeth Norfleet Hunter Williams)

 

Elisha Williams & Sarah Josy were married March 24th 1775 – children were William, Elisha, Josiah, Elizabeth Norfleet Hunter Williams my grandmother

 

Jos. Jon. Williams and Betsey N. H. Williams was married the 11th of February 1797

 

Jos John Williams and Mary K. Davis were married the 9th of February 1820

 

Col Joseph John Williams 1st youngest son of Samuel Williams and Elizabeth Alston (daughter of Judge John Alston of England) was a member of the Provincial Congress that met at Halifax April 4th 1776 and May 11th 1776. Appointed one of the commuter of safety for the State and was a member of the Legislature from Halifax County in 1777. He died in 1818. His will dated Feb. 15, 1816 was 1st married to Rosannah Conner who bore him;


1. Martha Williams= 1st Henry Hill 2d Dr. Samuel T. Thorne
2. Joseph John Williams Jr= Elizabeth Norfleet Hunter Williams
3. Henry Williams (no other record)
4. Elizabeth Williams (no other record)
5. Rosanna Conner Williams= md Dr. Jessie N. Faulcon


Col Joseph John Williams 2nd wife was Elizabeth Alston (daughter of Phillip Alston and Elizabeth Whitmel) who bore him:


1. Wineford Whitmel Williams= 1st James Harris no child 2nd James Harris (cousin of the above)
2. Catherine Williams= Heath (no further record)
3. William Williams (Pretty Billy)= 4 times

 

Elizabeth Williams = Hon Lemuel James Alston (1st wife) son of Solomon Alston Jr. & wife Sarah

 

Elisha Williams of Roanoke= Sarah Josie

children –

 

William,

Josiah,

Elisha and

Elizabeth who married Joseph John Williams Jr. who born him three children.

 

1.        James Conner Williams died.

 

2.        Elizabeth Alston Williams

1st    Harry Thorne

2nd   Dr. Nicholas Drake

one child died in infancy

 

3.        Joseph John Williams= Mary Kearney Davis (daughter of Archibald Davis & Elizabeth Crafford Hilliard)

Issue

1.        Mary Elizabeth Williams= Dr. Peter Hawkins,

2.        Joseph John Williams= died unmarried,

3.        Lucy Eugenia Williams= Maj. William H. Polk Tenn. * See bio of Maj. Polk below

4.        Thomas Caboin Williams= Virginia Poyer Boyd


After the death of Joseph John Williams 2nd his widow married Hon Lemuel James Alston as his 2nd wife (no issue)


Samuel Williams & Elizabeth Alston he died in 1753

children:


1. William Williams= Mrs. Thomas Blount
2. Solomon Williams= Tempie Boddie
3. Samuel Williams
4. Joseph John Williams= Rosannah Conner

 

§             Col Joseph John Williams died in 1818

 

o           Joseph John Williams 2d. married Elizabeth Norfleet Hunter Williams (daughter of Cleoha (Elisha) Williams & Sarah Josie

 

§             Joseph John Williams 3rd married Mary Kearney Davis

The complete test of the bible is included here for reference.  This copy came from web page http://www.ncgenweb.us/ncwarren/bibles/wm-polk-davis.htm
 

Williams-Polk-Davis Bible

Bible printed in 1832

Joseph John Williams Senior August 1775
Betsy N. H. Williams 6th March 1778
Jos. Jon. Williams and Betsey N. H. Williams was married the 11th of February 1797
James Conner Williams son of J. J. Williams and Betsy his wife was born Jan. 1st 1798
Jos. Jon Jun was born the 19th of August 1800
Elizabeth Alston Williams was born 6th of Sept. 1803
Jos Jon Williams Senior departed this life in his 34th year Sunday Eve 11 oclock 18th Sept. 1808
James C. Williams departed this life in 1813

Elizabeth Alston Williams Drake departed this life Dec. 2nd 1830
Joseph John Williams son of Jos John Williams & Betsey N. H. Williams departed this life in April 1833 in the 33rd year of his age.
Elisha Williams & Sarah Josy were married March 24th 1775 – children were William, Elisha, Josiah, Elizabeth --- Hunter Williams my grandmother
Jos John Williams Jr. son of Jos John Williams Senior & Betsey N. H. Williams was born the 19th day of August 1800
Mary Kearney Davis daughter of Archibald & Elizabeth Davis born the 13th of Dec. 1802
Jos John Williams and Mary H. Davis were married the 9th of February 1820
Mary Elizabeth Williams daughter of Jos John and Mary (light) Williams was born on Wednesday 13th of November 1822
Joseph John Williams was born on Friday August 27th 1824
Lucy Eugenia Williams born Tuesday the 11th of Oct. 1826
Thomas Calvin Williams born Tuesday morning 1 oclock 30th of Dec. 1828
William H. Polk and Lucy Eugenia Williams were married the 14th of July 1854 by the Rev. Philmon W. Archer
William H. Polk son of William H. Polk & Suey E. Polk was born in Columbia Tennessee the night of Aug. the 14th about 1 oclock 1855
Tasker Polk son of William H. Polk & Suey Polk was born in Columbia Tennessee March 24th 1861
Archibald Davis was born April 4th 1766
Elizabeth J. Hilliard born 1769
Thomas C. Williams departed this life Tuesday Apr. 27th 1 oclock 1855
Mrs. B. N. H. Alston departed this life on Sunday morning the 31st of January on her 87 year of age 1864
Mrs. Mary E. Hawkins departed this life Friday Oct. 25 at 20 minutes of 11 o’clock at night in her 45 year 1867
William H. Polk son of William H. Polk & Lucy C. Polk departed this life Oct. 17 about 9 o’ck p.m. at Birmingham Ala. in the 31st year of his age 1886
Mary K. Williams departed this life on Sunday Evening about 9 o’ck February 27 in the 85th year of her age 1887
Lucy E. Polk, widow of William H. Polk, departed this life January 11th 1906 at half past two o’clock a.m. at her house in Warrenton N. C. in the 90th year of her age.

Col Joseph John Williams 1st youngest son of Samuel Williams and Elizabeth Alston (daughter of Judge John Alston of England) was a member of the Provincial Congress that met at Halifax April 4th 1776 and May 11th 1776. Appointed one of the commuter of safety for the State and was a member of the Legislature from Halifax County in 1777. He died in 1818. His will dated Feb. 15, 1816 was 1st married to who bore him;
1. Martha Williams= 1st Henry Hill 2d Dr. Samuel T. Thorne
2. Joseph John Williams Jr= Elizabeth Norfleet Hunter Williams
3. Henry Williams (no other record)
4. Elizabeth Williams (no other record)
5. Rosanna Conner Williams= md Dr. Jessie N. Faulcon

Col Joseph John Williams 2nd wife was Elizabeth Alston (daughter of Phillip Alston and Elizabeth Whitmel) who bore him:
1. Wineford Whitmel Williams= 1st James Harris no child 2nd James Harris (cousin of the above)
2. Catherine Williams= Heath (no further record)
3. William Williams (Pretty Billy)= 4 times
Elizabeth Williams = Hon Lemuel James Alston
(1st wife) son of Solomon Alston Jr. & wife Sarah Elisha Williams of Roanoke= Sarah Josie children – William, Josiah, Elisha and Elizabeth who married
Joseph John Williams Jr. who born him three children. James Conner Williams died. Elizabeth Alston Williams 1st – Harry Thorne 2nd Dr. Nicholas Drake one child died in infancy
Joseph John Williams
After the death of Joseph John Williams 2nd his widow married Hon Lemuel James Alston as his 2nd wife (no issue)
Joseph John Williams= Mary Kearney Davis (daughter of Archibald Davis & Elizabeth Crafford Hilliard) Issue Mary Elizabeth Williams= Dr. Peter Hawkins, Joseph John Williams= died unmarried, Lucy Eugenia Williams= Maj. William H. Polk Tenn., Thomas Caboin Williams= Virginia Poyer Boyd

Samuel Williams & Elizabeth Alston he died in 1753 children:
1. William Williams= Mrs. Thomas Blount
2. Solomon Williams= Tempie Boddie
3. Samuel Williams
4. Joseph John Williams= Rosannah Conner Col Joseph John Williams died in 1813 1st married Rosannah Conner 2. Line Joseph John Williams 2d. 3. Line Married Elizabeth Norfleet Hunter Williams (daughter of Cleoha Williams & Sarah Josie Joseph John Williams 3rd 4. line married Mary Kearney Davis

Archibald Davis & Elizabeth Hilliard were married 1789
Ann Mana Davis born Sept. 30, 1790
Elizabeth Crawford Davis born Jan 21st 1792
Harty Hodge Davis born Apr 27, 1793
Leah Hilliard Davis born Aug. 27, 1795
James H. Davis was born July 21, 1797
Archibald H. Davis born June 3d 1799
Martha H. Davis born Feb. 22, 1801
Mary Kearney Davis born Dec. 13th 1802
Temperance W. Davis born Sept. 26, 1804
Thomas Davis born April 3rd 1806
John Calvin Davis born June 19, 1808
Lucy H. Davis was born Oct. 11th 1811
Archibald Davis departed this life Feb. 22, 1822
Elizabeth Hilliard Davis died Aug. 25, 1814
Ann Maria Condup died March 18, 1822
Elizabeth Crawford Alston died Jan. 17, 1872
Harty Hodge Williams died
Leah Hilliard Davis died
James H. Davis died 1798
Archibald H. Davis died Nov. 18, 1854
Martha H. Alston died May 20, 1875
Mary K. Williams died Feb. 27, 1887
Temperance W. Thorne died Aug. 5th 1854
Thomas Davis died Nov. 3, 1862
John Calvin Davis died
Jos. John Williams Sen. departed this life on Saturday the 13th of April in his 33rd year 1833
Jos. John Williams Jun. son of Jos. J. Williams Sr. departed this life at Randolph Macon College Wednesday the 15th of March 1843



Williams & Polk Family Bible
Brought in by Mrs. John Mitchell in 1975, Warrenton, N. C.
No pub. date

Births:

Jos John Williams Senior Aug. 1775
Betsy N. H. Williams Mar. 6, 1778
James Conner Williams, son of J. J. Williams & Betsy Jan. 1, 1798
Jos John Williams Junior, son of Jos John & Betsy N. H. Williams Aug. 19, 1800
Elizabeth Alston Williams Sept. 5, 1803
Archibald Davis Apr. 4, 1766
Elizabeth J. Hilliard 1769
Ann Maria Davis Sept. 30, 1790
Elizabeth Crawford Davis Jan 21, 1792
Harley Codge [Harty Hodge] Davis Aug. 27, 1795
James H. Davis July 21, 1797
Archibald H. Davis June 3, 1799
Martha N. Davis Feb. 22, 1801
Mary Kearney Davis, dau. of Archibald & Elizabeth Davis Dec. 13, 1802
Temperance W. Davis Sept. 26, 1804
Thomas Davis Apr. 3, 1806
John Calvin Davis June 19, 1808
Lucy H. Davis Oct. 11, 1811
Jos John Williams Jr, son of Jos John Williams Senior Aug. 19, 1800
Mary Elizabeth Williams, dau. of Jos John & Mary K. Williams Nov. 13, 1822
Joseph John Williams Aug. 27, 1824
Lucy Eugenia Williams Oct. 11, 1826
Thomas Calvin Williams Dec. 30, 1828
William H. Polk son of William H. Polk and Lucy E. Polk Aug. 14, 1855 in Columbia, Tennessee
Tasker Polk Polk son of William H. Polk and Lucy E. Polk Mar 24, 1861 in Columbia, Tennessee

Marriages:

Elisha Williams & Sarah Josey Mar. 24, 1775
(their children were William, Elisha, Josiah, and Elizabeth Norfleet Hunter Williams)
Jos John Williams & Betsey N. H. Williams Feb. 14, 1797
Archibald Davis & Elizabeth Hilliard 1789
William H. Polk & Lucy Eugenia Williams July 14, 1854 by Rev. Philmen W. Archer
Jos John Williams & Mary K. Davis Feb. 9, 1820

Deaths:

Jos Jon Williams Senior Sept. 18, 1808
James C. Williams 1813
Elizabeth Alston Williams Daeke [Drake] Dec. 2, 1830
Joseph John Williams, son of Jos John Williams & Betsy N. H. Williams Apr. 1833
Archibald Davis Feb. 22, 1822
Elizabeth Hilliard Davis Aug. 25, 1814
Ann Maria Gondup Mar. 18, 1822
Elizabeth Crawford Alston Jan. 17, 1872
Harty Hodge Williams
Leah Hilliard Davis
James H. Davis 1798
Archibald H. Davis Nov. 18, 1854
Martha H. Alston May 20, 1875
Mary K. Williams Feb. 27, 1887
Temperance W. Thorne Aug 6, 1854
Thomas Davis Nov. 3, 1862
John Calvin Davis
Jos John Williams Sen. Apr. 13, 1833
Jos John Williams Jun. Mar. 19, 1843
Thomas C. Williams Nov. 27, 1855
Mrs. B. N. H. Alston Jan. 31, 1864
Mrs. Mary E. Hawkins Oct. 25, 1867
William H. Polk Oct. 17, 1886

Williams Polk Davis Bible

Following is a short biography of William H. Polk, brother of President James K. Polk and husband of Betsy's grandaughter Lucy Eugenia Williams.  He was the daughter of Joseph John Williams and his wife Mary Kearney Davis Williams.

 

POLK, William Hawkins, (1815 - 1862)


POLK, William Hawkins, (brother of President James Knox Polk), a Representative from Tennessee; born in Maury County, Tenn., May 24, 1815; attended the city schools, Columbia, Tenn., and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1832 and 1833; was graduated from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1839 and commenced practice in Columbia, Tenn.; member of the State house of representatives 1842-1845; Minister to the Kingdom of Naples and served from March 13, 1845, to August 31, 1847; served as major of the Third Dragoons in the Mexican War in 1847 and 1848; elected as an Independent Democrat to the Thirty-second Congress (March 4, 1851-March 3, 1853); resumed the practice of law; died in Nashville, Tenn., December 16, 1862; interment in Greenwood Cemetery, Columbia, Tenn.